Weekly Recap - March 17, 2017

Do you trust brands? An eMarketer study found that most women are skeptical. In fact, 48 percent have a hard time trusting financial service brands, 37 percent distrust healthcare brands and 24 percent distrust nonprofits. Even with social activism on the rise, Millennials are dubious about cause marketing to be skeptical. Still they yearn to be philanthropic. Where’s the give? Seeing isn’t necessarily believing. Digiday suggests brands’ viewability isn’t the be-all end-all. Let’s break it down.

DETAILS, please

What brands can do to win the trust of women. Brand trust seems to matter more than ever, though it may be harder than ever to build that trust.

Infographic: What consumers really think about cause marketing. With social activism on the rise, more brands are aligning themselves with philanthropic causes in hopes of burnishing their reputations—and their bottom lines.

Focus on viewability, but don’t make it the goal. It seems like a total no-brainer: No one wants to pay for ads that can’t be seen. But viewability is just one factor in an effective campaign.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Millennials find clever ways to finance life. Millennials aren’t the first generation to tap the Bank of ‘Rents. But they’re particularly sensitive about the handouts.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide "Communicating with Visuals."

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Weekly Recap - December 23, 2016

Let’s talk Twitter. Last week, the social platform announced you can now broadcast live video without having to create a Periscope account. Think about all the branded opportunities for 2017? Video is even one of the top six digital trends for 2017, says Adweek. What else makes the list? Influencer marketing. Because 53 percent of women made purchases due to influencer posts. Let’s dive in.

DETAILS, please

Twitter unveils live video: Here’s what you need to know. How does this impact video marketing?

6 digital trends in 2017 that will redefine influence and interaction for marketers. What is in store for next year?  

53 percent of women made purchases due to influencer posts. Not only do women rule social media, but they are also influential, discerning and willing to buy based on influencer recommendations.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

A year in review: Facebook. Every year brings advancements and enhancements—and 2016 was no different.

Hospital system backs patient experience with refund policy. Patients increasingly want the same level of customer service at the hospital that they get at the Genius Bar, according to McKinsey & Company research.

THE Topic of conversation

Instagram. Learn how your business can use Instagram to build brand awareness and increase engagement. Download our free whitepaper "Why your business should be marketing on Instagram."

SHARING is CARING

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Rethink Breast Cancer makes it easy to show you care.

Rethink Breast Cancer makes it easy to show you care

When my brother’s wife was diagnosed with breast cancer, we bought her a tablet to pass the time during her recovery. She loves to read, so it seemed a good choice. A year later, when my husband’s sister was diagnosed, we gave her a pressed metal necklace.

Why? I have no idea. My mother-in-law reacted in typically blunt fashion. “Why are you giving her presents? It’s cancer, not a birthday party.”

We just wanted to do something to let her know we were thinking of her. That we love her. And to somehow bridge the 4,200 miles that separated us from her while she battled cancer without us. So many things come to mind now that she’s four years cancer-free. But when you’re spinning with worry, thoughtful gift ideas rarely come in focus.

Rethink Breast Cancer gets it. The young women’s breast cancer movement has created thoughtful Give-A-Care products that help friends diagnosed with breast cancer get through the tough time ahead. More than a gesture, the collection includes meaningful gifts that acknowledge what’s she’s tackling, and helps support her along the way.

You can gift goodies a-la-carte or send carefully curated packages that come in small, medium and large. Items range from the practical—a planner, hand sanitizer, water bottle, tissue and tote—to the comfy—plush hoodies and a 100 percent cashmere toque that promises both warmth and style. There’s even a children’s book for moms to help with difficult conversations and can’t-we-ever-have-a-normal-conversation candy hearts inscribed with texts like “u r my rock.” All gifts come with a complementary care guidelines catered to young women who have a breast cancer diagnosis.

What’s more, Give-a-Care products keep on giving. All proceeds from sales fund Rethink Breast Cancer. The nonprofit is dedicated to raise awareness about breast cancer in those under the age of 40.

Talk about a feel-good fest. The giver feels like she’s helping. The recipient feels understood. And the nonprofit gets more funding to fuel great ideas to help more patients.

This kind of brand authenticity is what consumers crave across industries. There’s nothing like a confident decision to make people loyal advocates. The trick is to know your audience. Rethink Breast Cancer knows its target audience down to the cellular level. 

Speaking of brand authenticity, download our free whitepaper “3 Rules to Creating an Authentic Brand.” And discover which brands are getting real and how to market authenticity across genders, generations and ethnic groups.

Unconditional acceptance inspires new women’s health campaign.

We women come in all ages, shapes and sizes. With differing personalities, talents, preferences and habits (good, bad or indifferent). Yet, even though we may not realize it, we all have something in common: our need for acceptance.  

This reality became the basis for a women’s health campaign we created for our client, Franciscan Alliance, a 14-hospital Catholic health system in Northern Indiana. In a charming, lightly humorous manner, the “Perfectly Human” campaign lets women know that they are beautiful just as God made them, whether they jiggle a little when they jog or can’t hold a tree pose. And that Franciscan Alliance is the healthcare partner they can count on throughout their life’s journey with: “Inspiring health for every woman.”

Personally, I am in awe and admiration of their strong, faith-based stance as it’s not something you see in every Catholic hospital’s messaging. As Strategic Healthcare Marketing noted in a recent article about the campaign: “This strives to take away some of the guilt and pressure many people feel over not meeting standards.”

 

In addition to winning a Silver Service Industry Association Award, the two-month campaign resulted in a 504 percent increase in website visits to women’s health landing pages with a 477 percent increase in new users. Now that’s inspiring! Let us know how this healthcare marketing campaign made you feel as a woman.

Check out our blog series “Marketing to the Generations” to learn how to connect with women and men, from Millennials to Boomers.

Blog Category: 

Weekly Recap - November 13, 2015

weekly recap

Not sure how to describe that frock you found on the net? Pinterest is on it. Its new search tool lets you search and purchase by image. Is it a Sabrina or Sweetheart neckline? No matter. Pic, search Pins and purchase. Meanwhile, Instragram is ramping up its virtual mall, adding a “shop now” button and blowing out its ad formats. If you’re ready to advertise, Social Media Times has the complete guide to promoting on Instagram. Just make sure your “house” is ready for visitors, Hubspot suggests. Not sure? Check this list of 12 critical elements every homepage should include. If you don’t care, mom surely does—especially Millennial mom. She carries a mobile phone and isn’t afraid to use it.   

DETAILS, please
Pinterest becomes a ‘discovery engine’ through visual search. On Monday, Pinterest began offering a feature that lets users search its site without using text. Want to copy a look you find on the web? Take a snip and search on Pinterest for similar styles from its gallery of pins.

The complete guide to advertising on Instagram (infographic). Instagram is becoming a more powerful advertising platform, as more and more companies gain access to the channel. Salesforce, recently honored as an Instagram Partner, illustrated the specs to success in a snazzy infographic. Break it down for us, SF.

12 critical elements every website homepage must have (infographic). If you’re considering a website redesign, it’s a good idea to start with the homepage. (That is after you’ve developed your business case.) Is it primed for visitors? More importantly, for prospects?

Millennial moms get it done with mobile. Millennial moms in the US are digitally savvy. You want a piece of this purse? Make it digital. This cohort is more likely to go mobile to research, read reviews and ultimately buy, and also feels comfortable making purchases online without having to see items first in person.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH
A lot has been brewing this week–from Starbucks’ holiday cups to the latest in graphic design lingo and all kinds of Instragram inspiration. Dive in.

Starbucks' holiday cup: the skinny, the grande and the ugly. Color. Caffeine. Controversy. Something about this traditional holiday promotion has one consumer group seeing red. What could possibly be causing Donald Trump, Candace Cameron Bure and countless others to weigh in on a coffee cup?

18 graphic design terms every marketer should know.  Ever wondered how brands determine color palettes? Or how brand standards are developed and executed? If you’re in marketing, you need to understand the language—at least the basics.

6 Inspiring design accounts to follow on Instagram. At Brogan & Partners, we like to think creatively. Here are six design accounts on Instagram that will leave you feeling inspired.

THE topic of conversation
Social Media. Still. And probably for some time to come. Late to the party? Then you need to read our free whitepaper “The Evolution of Social Media Marketing: 9 trends to know now.” Pronto. Before someone asks you whether you prefer to favorite or retweet. 

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Millennial women defy marketing labels.

Millennial women defy marketing labels.

Marketers love to label consumers. Early adopter. Fast follower. Foodie. Loyalist. Bargain-hunter. Boomer. Gen We. Labels help us make sense of consumer behavior, providing insights that help inform marketing and advertising strategy.

For example, Generation Xers are notoriously skeptical and unfailingly loyal. So while it takes brands a great deal to win their favor, it takes little to retain it. That’s why Netflix is so popular with this cohort.  The on-demand video-streaming company invested in high-quality, original content like Orange is the New Black and House of Cards, then backfilled its library with nostalgic titles like Arrested Development to lure Xers. Smart move, considering Xers value pay-TV more highly than other generations. (High acquisition cost + modest maintenance cost = loyal Gen Xer.)

So, what’s a marketer to do with an entire generation that defies labels? And not just any generation, the nation’s largest living generation.

Millennials prefer to be label-free. In fact, they don’t particularly like to be called Millennials.

According to the latest Pew research, Millennials don’t identify with the term “Millennial.” Only 40 percent of adults 18-34 consider themselves Millennials and another 33 percent (mostly on the older end of the Millennial spectrum) identify with Generation X.

 

Only 40 percent of adults 18-34 consider themselves Millennials

 

Female Millennials are particularly elusive. But their annual combined purchasing power—$840 billion—makes them worth the effort (CEB Iconoculture research).

I am unpredictable. I am accepting. I am Millennial woman.

Many marketers are frustrated by the sense that Millennial women are unpredictable because they aren’t thinking like—or doing what—previous generations of women did, according to CEB Iconoculture. They don’t relate to the “I can do it all” Enjoli woman of the Boomer age.  And they don’t act much like the “never let them see you sweat” Gen Xer woman either. This is partly because they grew up at a time when pay parity and gender equality were the norm. So unlike their moms and grandmothers, they’re unencumbered with having to prove their worth and fight for a seat at the table.

This empowerment has left Millennial women largely undefinable, blissfully rowing in different directions. Although most Millennial women say they’re on track to meet career goals, 71 percent have “ambitions other than leadership,” according to a Zeno Group survey. Most (79 percent) are concerned about work-life balance and 49 percent question whether climbing the corporate ladder is worth the personal sacrifice.

 

Millennial women have an annual combined purchasing power of $840 billion

 

This is where we (finally) find common ground: purpose and individuality differentiate Millennial women, says CEB Iconoculture. They prize these values significantly more than older generations of women. What this means is that while Millennial women have differing motivations and aspirations, they respect opposing opinions and alternative pursuits.

Baby-formula behemoth Similac captures these values comically in its spot “The Mother ‘Hood.”  West Side Story meets Romper Room in this spoof on the Mommy Wars Millennial women say they don’t want to participate in. By depicting parents who adhere to a range of parenting philosophies ultimately uniting over a common goal, Similac reminds consumers that no matter what their choices, parents are more alike than they are different. 

4 factors to consider when marketing to Millennial women.

In addition to their differentiating values, Millennial women share four key purchasing motivators, according to CEB Iconoculture.  They are: (1) Does it save me time? (2) Does it save me money? (3) Does it serve a purpose? (4) Is it a good, quality product?

Brands can illustrate these attributes by flaunting flexibility, practicality, choice and equality.

Make it flexible: T.J. Maxx recently launched a campaign with a diverse range of consumers experiencing different realities (parents of teenagers, female colleagues, young kids, a mature woman living with a younger man). It’s all about right-sizing for the individual, or in ad speak “Maxx-imizing.” The spot speaks directly to Millennial women’s ability to adapt to change. 

Make it practical: Warby Parker’s are more than stylish, the craftsman construction appeals to Millennials’ penchant for good quality. (“From premium Japanese titanium to custom
single-sheet cellulose acetate sourced from a family-run Italian factory, we use the best materials for our frames.”) What’s more, the value proposition “buy a pair, give a pair” serves a higher purpose that connects with Millennial women on a higher level. Finally, the brand helps consumers save precious time with at-home and virtual try-on features.

Give her choices: Ram Trucks spot “Courage is Already Inside” features women passionately engaged in activities both traditionally feminized (ballet, childcare) and anything but (bow hunting, military service). It celebrates the women for the intensity of their efforts and the breadth of their personal possibilities, rather than promoting a traditional ideal.  

Make all things equal: For Millennial women, equality is the expectation. And since inclusion is part of their reality, they want to see equality (and diversity) reflected in the media they consume. As a group, they’re also extremely aware and critical of advertising that doesn’t do a good job of showcasing a broad range of viewpoints and experiences. Nike’s spot “Better for It: Inner Thoughts” features an ethnically diverse group of women, exercising at varying levels of fitness. The spot attempts to capture various motivations that find women doing marathons, yoga, spinning and more.

Want to get to know more about Millennials? Download our Marketing to Millennials whitepaper now.

Weekly Recap - May 11, 2015

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

Facebook Carousel Format Now Available for Mobile App Ads
Facebook also said early analysis shows that the new format has helped boost click-through rates by an average of 12 percent compared with carousel ads when advertisers let the social network automatically optimize their order of images.

carousel ads

Infographic: How Becoming a Mom Changes Millennials' Buying and Media Habits
Having a baby shifts priorities across the board, from consumer preferences and purchasing criteria to media preferences.

Infographic: YouTube Ads Are Reportedly Viewable 91% of the Time
Research also states that being heard is almost as good as being seen.

How to Use Pinterest to Generate Revenue [Infographic]
The simple truth is this: Amidst the ab workouts and IKEA furniture hacks, there lies a huge opportunity for businesses to use Pinterest to drive revenue.

Digital Natives Demand a Retail Revolution
Whether it is Dollar Shave Club, Warby Parker or Birch Box, these companies have traded large brick-and-mortar retail spaces for direct-to-consumer distribution.

B2Bs Need to Step Up Email Automation
Three-quarters say fewer than half of email campaigns are triggered.

Weekly Recap - April 27, 2015

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

Enough SAID enlists donors for rape justice
The non-profit Michigan Women’s Foundation launched Enough SAID to drive awareness of rape prevention.

Hashing Out Hashtags: What They Are & How to Use Them [Infographic]
These helpful tips and tricks demonstrate the importance and the proper frequency of using hashtags on social platforms.

how to use hashtags

Advertising + entertainment = branded content. Three techniques you should know.
Branded content, also known as “branded entertainment” or “advertainment,” is the fusion of entertainment or editorial content with brands and branded information.

Social Advertising: Are You Adding Value or Just Begging For Attention?
While consumers often don’t mind interacting with brands on their own terms, they’ve grown more savvy at avoiding ads otherwise.

STUDY: Interaction with Instagram Posts Trounces Facebook, Twitter
When it comes to interaction with posts, Instagram blows away parent company Facebook and Twitter, according to a recent study by social analytics provider Quintly.

To Engage Audiences with Storytelling, Don't Just Think Like a Pop Star
Engaging consumers deeply and long-term through storytelling has become the means to driving loyalty and revenue growth.

Weekly Recap - April 6, 2015

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

How Often Should Companies Blog? [New Benchmark Data]
Depending on your company size and business type, these helpful benchmarks show how the number of blog posts published monthly and in total can affect traffic and leads.

why companies should blog

The Ideal Length for All Your Social Media Posts [Infographic]
Users are less likely to click if you don't optimize each post for both your choice of words and the length of the update.

Are Men Bigger Digital Shoppers than Women?
Stereotypes be gone! It turns out that males click the digital “buy” button more frequently than females, according to January 2015 research by Bronto Software.

Which Brands Are Taking Advantage of Instagram?
Instagram will boast more than 100 million US users by 2018, eMarketer estimates, and this year, the social network’s audience will rise by nearly 21% to 77.6 million users.

Dove's Latest Film Makes Women Choose If They Are 'Beautiful' or 'Average'
Over the past decade, Dove has had a laser focus, challenging women's concepts of beauty and championing "real women" to see themselves as beautiful.

Carousel Ads Debut on Instagram
Instagram announced the launch of carousel ads last month, and launch partners Showtime, Banana Republic, Old Navy, L’Oréal Paris and Samsung showed off their uses of the advertising feature in a post on the Instagram for Business blog.

A Simple Guide to Using Hashtags
When used properly, though, hashtags can be a powerful marketing tool in helping drive brand recognition, boost conversions, and positively impact customer loyalty. 

The Power of Brand Authenticity on Social Media [Infographic]
This infographic outlines how authenticity can drive high returns — for both brands and independent creators — and engender consumer trust.

6 Customer Service Tips for Brands on Facebook
Author, speaker and small business coach Barry Moltz shared a half-dozen customer service tips with Facebook for Business.

Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #30 St. John Health.

This campaign is very special to my heart. The reason? First off, it was a very tight, hard-working campaign that broke through to create a strong brand and emotional connection for St. John Health. As a faith-based health system, what made St. John Health different in the competitive healthcare landscape was their unique approach to healing “mind, body and spirit.” We came up with the themeline, “A passion for healing,” and rolled out a campaign which used a storytelling format to emotionally connect female healthcare decision makers to the brand. One such female is also the other reason this campaign is special to me: Ellyn Davidson. When Ellyn, our managing partner, saw the memorable brand TV spot below, she was inspired to do a self-breast exam in her shower. She found a lump. And yes, it was breast cancer. Early detection is one of the reasons Ellyn has been cancer-free for 7 years. And we are all so grateful that she is.

The emotion in this campaign is undeniable. Radio stations were talking about it. Neighbors of mine told me it made them cry. Our client even made me a shadow box filled with the letters staff sent to her about how moving it was and how well it articulated their brand. That shadow box still sits in my office today. But the campaign was also smart. With a modular themeline that we used to highlight different clinical specialties, a print format that encapsulated all the nine hospitals in the health system in a book mark design and cable ad tags that used zone-targeting to effectively advertise the right local hospital to the community. It was powerful brand campaign on many levels.

I find healthcare marketing very rewarding to work on, and this campaign was a career highlight for me and the agency. What do you think of it?

To see the rest of the 30 Best of Brogan, visit our original post in this series: Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising.

Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising: #25 The HoneyBaked Ham Company.

Since 2006, Brogan & Partners has had the privilege of advertising one of America’s favorite foods: HoneyBaked Ham. HoneyBaked’s willingness to experiment with a variety of different media and creative concepts has given us the chance to explore and grow as an agency—and grow HoneyBaked’s market at the same time.

The holidays are HoneyBaked’s bread and butter (and Ham and Turkey), so during the holiday season of 2008, we decided to get their message out very, very loudly . . . by screaming it. We created a TV spot featuring the Screaming Banshee, a popular character from Hallmark e-cards. The spot positioned HoneyBaked Ham as a tasty hero, rescuing stressed-out consumers from holiday overload. We even created a coordinating holiday e-card.  

In 2010, we convinced HoneyBaked’s many divisions to collaborate on a national Facebook page. In the first year of its launch, the page attracted more than 40,000 fans, and this year, it reached the 100,000 fan mark. Starting with simple posts describing their delicious offerings, the page has grown to include games, contests, charitable promotions and more.  

In 2012, we pinned down yet another new strategy for HoneyBaked: their Pinterest page. We launched it with a “12 Days of Christmas” sweepstakes, asking fans to re-pin our festive artwork to enter. By the end of the holidays, HoneyBaked had over 2000 followers.

Brogan and HoneyBaked’s latest venture: Their own holiday station on Pandora (HoneyBaked Holiday Radio). HoneyBaked may be a traditional favorite, but thanks to their willingness to experiment with new media, their marketing will never be old-fashioned.

To see the rest of the 30 Best of Brogan, visit our original post in this series: Celebrating 30 years of creative advertising.

Most women favor childhood immunizations, despite vocal opposition

Most women favor childhood immunizations to protect kids from serious diseases like polio, tetanus and measles.

This is according to the latest survey of Brogan Talks to Women (BTTW), an informal community of female consumers we engage regularly for opinions and insights about marketing and advertising. With some 30 years of healthcare marketing experience, Brogan & Partners was naturally curious about the impact social marketing is having on childhood immunizations.

Of the 189 participants—65 percent of whom are moms or guardians—95 percent support childhood vaccinations. The primary reasons cited were to guard against serious disease (93 percent), evidence provided by public health agencies and other experts (59 percent), having been vaccinated as a child with no ill effects (55 percent), a family physician’s recommendation (40 percent) and having vaccinated their kids with no ill effects (35 percent).
 

Pfizer Ireland recently began a program to raise awareness of the importance of childhood vaccinations.

Of the 5 percent who oppose childhood immunizations, the chief concerns noted were potential side effects such as autism (56 percent) and suspicion that immunization against relatively harmless childhood diseases may be responsible for the dramatic increase in autoimmune diseases since mass inoculations were introduced (44 percent).

Opposition swelled after fraudulent article was published

Since the 1990s, vaccines have become somewhat controversial. Of particular note was a fraudulent article published in 1998 in the medical journal The Lancet.  The researchers suggested a link between the combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, fueling the anti-childhood vaccine movement. The cause soon migrated from academic publications to mainstream, attracting celebrity spokespeople like actress and mom Jenny McCarthy.

According to the Pediatric Academic Society, childhood vaccinations in the U.S. prevent about 10.5 million cases of infectious illness and 33,000 deaths per year. A vaccine, like any medicine, can cause a reaction. But the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In fact, immunization is one of the most important things a parent can do for their children’s health, protecting them from 14 serious diseases, according to the CDC. And failure to vaccinate may mean putting children at risk for serious diseases.

Social media popular debate channel for Millennial moms

Still, parents worry. Particularly Millennial moms. In addition to conflicting news stories and public health campaigns, Millennial parents are caught up in Facebook news feeds where childhood immunization opinions are as common as cat photos.

“Some posts on Facebook spurred a conversation with my doctor, specifically about the Tdap and keeping current,” said a BTTW respondent when asked about recent information that has influenced her position on childhood immunizations. “Social media has caused me to question many times, especially when seeing opinions from people I know, but it is easy to get inaccurate information.”

Doctors’ offices and clinics were ranked the most reputable sources for information about vaccination, with 89 percent of respondents, followed by health and parenting magazines/books (32 percent), Internet (19 percent), friends and family (13 percent) and television (5 percent).

“I trust my children's pediatrician believes what she says and I believe Internet sources such as Natural News is reporting the truth too,” said a BTTW respondent. “It is challenging to reconcile the varying opinions and make the decision that I feel is best for my children.”

CDC spends between $8-12 million annually to promote vaccinations

Expect the CDC to continue to be a significant part of the narrative. Overall, the CDC spends between $8 million and $12 million each year on a wide range of vaccination messages focused on topics from childhood inoculations to flu shots for the elderly. In addition to traditional media, the agency employs an arsenal of earned, owned and paid nontraditional channels to encourage vaccination. The CDC even has an app for physicians to stay on schedule.

Why the big media spend? Because the CDC and other world health organizations are concerned that controversy over childhood immunization has sparked an increase in preventable diseases.

In the U.S., the prevalence of whooping cough increased in 2012 to nearly 50,000 cases. Last year, cases dropped to about 24,000. Still, this is more than 10 times the number reported back in the early 1980s when the bacteria infected less than 2,000 people. This interactive map illustrating the rise of preventable diseases around the world from the Council on Foreign Relations presents a pretty compelling case for the CDC’s campaign marketing spend.

Are you female and interested in joining Brogan Talks to Women? Click here to learn more.

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  • Brogan & Partners has worked on a wide variety of health issues for us over the years. They have not only consistently provided innovative ideas and award winning campaigns, but they continue to help us work towards our overall goal of improving the health of Michigan residents.  Their creativity, expertise, and enthusiasm makes them an invaluable partner in our... More

  • Hiring Brogan & Partners to help Michigan Women’s Foundation create the brand and messaging around the campaign to raise millions of dollars to solve the backlog of untested rape kits in Detroit was a slam dunk!  With a well-deserved reputation for getting to the heart of complex and highly-charged issues with clear, action-driven communications, the Brogan team... More

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  • When launching a startup, resources are very constrained and a startup has to pick its partners very carefully and with deliberation. There were many services that we have had to forego in the early stages of our company, Memloom. One crucial need, however, was identifying and aligning with a strong marketing partner who could help us with our brand, positioning and... More

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  • From the very first meeting we had with Brogan & Partners, it was clear that they had done their research on PREZIO Health, our competitors and the industry.  It has been  a very positive experience working with the Brogan & Partners team to re-design all of our service and product sheets as well as the total re-design of our website.  Their creativity is top-... More

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