Weekly Recap - May 26, 2017

Got any good Stories? Instagram Stories are expanding to include specific locations and hashtags. Speaking of Instagram, new research shows the social media site is taking off in Europe. Bon voyage. How do you measure a tweet? We’ve got five ideas. There’s also a bit below about avoiding content marketing mistakes. But don’t believe everything you read on the web, especially when it comes to SEO. Cue ominous music.

DETAILS, Please

Instagram just announced two new types of Stories so you can watch forever. Instagram stories just got an upgrade.

5 helpful insights you can find using Twitter Analytics. Analytics can be confusing. Look at some advice from the pros.

5 content marketing mistakes you should avoid to earn more Links. Offline, we don’t like traffic. Online, we do. Here’s how to get more of it.

Bad SEO information: Too easy to find, impossible to escape. The internet is a misleading place, and some SEO information is just plain wrong.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

6 top takeaways from Iconosphere 2017. The vibe was strategic, energizing and inspiring. Speakers spouted future-forward ideas, consumer insights and timely research.

How to find a rainbow at the end of a troll storm. Blame it on the anonymity of the internet or the juiced up political environment. Whatever the prompt, trolls are inescapable. Even puppies aren't immune.

THE Topic of conversation

Instagram. Learn how your business can use Instagram to build brand awareness and increase engagement. Download our free whitepaper, Why your business should be marketing on Instagram.

SHARING is CARING

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How to find a rainbow at the end of a troll storm.

"That's 2017."

This from my 14-year-old daughter, Sofia, in response to my confusion over trolls who litter the Money Diaries website.

Launched in 2016, Money Diaries is a website featuring more than 100 diaries from women who chronicle their spending over a week's time. The writers give an intimate look inside their lives as they share daily choices to work their budgets. Women, mostly Millennial women, are addicted to the site for its authenticity and transparency.

Others love it just to hate it.

Like "Heroic Eye," who wrote this in response to "A Week in New York on a $53,000 Salary:"

"These are not meals. Also, she literally drinks alcohol 6 out of the 7 days she recorded info for this series. There's a hella lot of coffee with not a lot on her stomach (so she can feel awake). And most of the nights she listed, she doesn't get home until 12:30-2:30am (even though the majority of her mornings begin between 7-8am)."

"Fresh Heart" had this to say about the same diary after another reader defended the author.

"Hey — you put it out there in a PUBLIC article, you will get judged. It's not like we're breaking into her apartment and judging her. She wrote it up and published it online for all to read, so shut up. That's asking for judgment."

Blame it on the anonymity of the internet or the juiced up political environment. Whatever the prompt, trolls are inescapable. Even puppies aren't immune. Sofia showed me a YouTube post where a girl proudly introduced her new ball of canine cuddliness. Someone actually accused her of being a cat-hater.

Even puppies aren't safe from trolls.

If puppy posts aren't safe from scrutiny, neither is your brand. If you're on social media or you host a blog, chances are, you've already met a few trolls.

Campbell's sparked a troll frenzy after featuring a real-life gay couple and their toddler son in an ad. A woman named Jessica from the ultra-conservative group "One Million Moms" sparked the feud, posting on Campbell's Facebook page: "I'm so sick of this homosexual agenda, you sell soup… Please take your ad down or you will not have a company anymore!"

Campbell's responded with a statement supporting families of "different configurations, cultures, races and life choices."

Things got really interesting when someone set up a fake Facebook Page "Campbell For Help" to troll the troller. "My word, Jessica. That's quite a leap. While we at Campbell's Kitchen take pride in being empathetic, we are finding it hard to empathize with your vantage point. Would you just prefer we send you some of our classic tomato soup? It's real soup-er?"

Four tactics to tackle trolls.

You can't count on a white knight troll to save your brand from such attacks. So, if you've not already established a plan to manage negative posts, get to it. Your plan should include at least four basic tactics—watch, ignore, engage and employ.

  1. Watch. Take a deep breath and see if any fans come to your defense. There's nothing better than a loyal fan fighting for your honor.

  2. Ignore it. Sometimes the best course of action is to do nothing at all. This is especially true when the troll's comments are especially outlandish. Your followers know the difference between a rant and a true injustice. You're a big brand. You can take a few hits without damaging your reputation. For courage, visit the social media channels of airlines, hospital systems and utility companies. Pacific Gas & Electric didn't engage with the conversation below, however tempting.

  3. Engage with it. When people feel wronged today, they're more likely to post on social media than pick up the phone. If you're in the business of serving customers, your Facebook page is most importantly an extension of your customer service team. Customers expect swift and thoughtful action.

    When your brand is in the wrong, own up to it and use the opportunity to deepen your customer relationships. Kroger gets it. The community managers there are prompt and courteous. The proof is in the posts. Once the team responds, most conversations are wrapped up in a tidy bow. Here's just one of hundreds of recent exchanges:

  4. Learn from it. In addition to vanity metrics—likes, shares, follows—brands should be using social media to manage customer satisfaction and referrals. Your social following is a living, consuming focus group. Use their input to discover flaws and realize opportunities. Find the rainbow at the end of a troll storm. Cue Target.

    When the superstore announced plans to scrub stores of extraneous gender-based signage—boys' toys, girls' bedding, etc.—the trolls marched all over Target's Facebook Page, fuming about political correctness and threatening boycott.

    Target followed up months later with another controversial move, welcoming customers to use the bathroom and fitting room in accordance with their gender identities.The bold move was likely advanced, in part, by the enormous support the retailer received on social after the earlier gender-neutral signage brouhaha. The waters had been tested. They were ready to go full inclusion, knowing full well that it would ignite a vigorous social media debate.

Got a troll nipping at your brand? Use it to the best of your brand's ability. Need help managing your social media channels? These apps are a good start.

6 top takeaways from Iconosphere 2017.

6 top takeaways from Iconosphere 2017

The vibe was strategic, energizing and inspiring. Speakers spouted future-forward ideas, consumer insights and timely research. The result?  High level fuel to power successful strategies for our clients from the Iconosphere 2017 conference held in Vegas last week. Among the top 6 takeaways for me were:

  1. “Play deficit disorder” is a growing problem.  Uh oh, yet another disorder! Do you check emails while on vacation?  Believe sleep deprivation is a status symbol? Feel compelled to check things off your list? According to Rebeccca Kolls, consumer strategist, you may fall into the category of needing “permission to play.”  Don’t worry, you are not to blame, what with your childhood conditioning of “You can play when your room is clean” or “You can play after you practice piano.” With a productivity increase of 400 percent since the 1950s, we are losing the tug of war between productivity and play. And our guilt-fueled ability to play (which, by the way, is rated important by nine out of 10), has even been segmented into three groups, with marketing implications to match (think time - and money-saving solutions).
  1. “Privacy” wins over “Security” in communicating about consumer health data. Personal health data is big business, fueling healthcare innovation. However, we so fear giving it away. Why? Because it’s personal. We want to control and own our data. We’re not sure where it will go (e.g. Will it affect my insurance rates?). Research shows that marketers can gain more trust with the word, “privacy,” over “security,” and that communicating HOW health data provision will benefit you with specific positive outcomes reaps results. Think 23andMe DNA testing, which focuses upon the positive results of knowing your genetic history.
  1. A world without smart phones is on the horizon. Just when I finally got our 87-year-old mother to use one! In his Look Ma, No Hands keynote, Consumer Strategist Mike Garrison told us smart phones are on the way out. The audience was in shock and denial, which he quickly validated with video snippets of people saying, “I panic without my smart phone,” “I have my whole life in here,” and the ultimate, “but I love my smart phone.” Okay, so I’m not alone in my emotions, but the fact is sales have plateaued for smart phones, and smart phone features aren’t boosting demand anymore. People are talking about things like “smart phone addiction” and the need for “digital detox” (unplugging), all signaling the entry of the next big thing. Think Alexa, hands-free, device-agnostic ability for content fluidity. (Okay, I’ll try…)
  1. The “struggling moment” is the seed for all innovation. So says keynote speaker Bob Moseta and president of The Rewired Group. Since consumers lie to themselves and him about what they want, he finds the struggling moment for each purchase decision. His motto: “Bitchin’ ain’t switchin’!” And since he is the creator of that cool, little arrow that indicates the gas tank side of the car on  your dashboard, as well as the Snickers campaign that positioned the candy bar as food, not candy (You’re not you when you’re hungry), we believe him!
  1. 72 percent of Gen We high schoolers plan to start a business someday. That figure shocked me. And the same amount would trade a year of social media for their own car. They value their independence, know the value of a dollar (76 percent consider how much things cost), and celebrate diversity (the most diverse generation ever, with 48 percent non-white).
  1. Beatles Love Show is arguably the best show in Vegas. Or at least the best I’ve ever seen.  This endorphin-producing, multi-media explosion of creativity is a testament to the meaning of emotional connection – something we strive for every day with our work. We agreed we would have gladly paid twice our ticket price for the experience!

Need more insights? Check out From insights to innovation: Applying creativity to connect the dots.

Weekly Recap - May 19, 2017

A cute puppy, pretty floral crown and contemplative scientist. No this isn’t a plot to a commercial. These are Instagram’s new lenses. That’s right, lenses. The visual platform took a page out of Snapchat’s book and updated Stories to include these engaging new features. Snapchat’s response? Well, they stepped up their game and added augmented reality features to their world lenses. It’s all about content performance, so says eMarketer. Take a look.

DETAILS, please

Instagram adds 'face filters' to complete its Snapchat transformation. It was bound to happen eventually. 

Snapchat releases sponsored world lenses, allowing brands to augment reality. In its ongoing quest to stay ahead of Facebook, Snap is bringing ads to the real world. 

Measuring content performance is a top priority for nearly two-thirds of marketers. Content performance tools measure the impact and effectiveness of content by monitoring engagement, consumption and audience growth.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

From insights to innovation: Applying creativity to connect the dots. Here are five insights learned at Iconosphere 2017.

Money Diaries is the Millennial woman's Bridget Jones. I wonder what’s in her wallet?

5 things Millennials want from healthcare. America’s largest cohort is no longer a bunch of texting teens.

THE Topic of conversation

Instagram. Learn how your business can use Instagram to build brand awareness and increase engagement. Download our free whitepaper "Why your business should be marketing on Instagram."

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5 things Millennials want from healthcare.

America’s largest cohort is no longer a bunch of texting teens. They are adults, adults who are becoming parents and shopping for health insurance. And as Millennials look for healthcare, marketers need to know the best way to reach out to them. These quick facts will help healthcare providers better understand this generation.

  1. Show them how it works

    Millennials value safety more than other generations. They are a more insecure generation, growing up during hard times such as mass shootings and 9/11, according to CEB Iconoculture research. Healthcare providers should be aware of this, and welcome the opportunity to help Millennials through the healthcare process so they feel safe. Many will be buying health insurance for the first time. They will want to know the step-by-step process of purchasing healthcare, along with when to schedule appointments and tips for selecting a physician. Give them an authentic, easy-to-understand approach for this complicated process. Simple, yet relatable ads like Oscar insurance create the intimate feel Millennials are looking for.

    Procrastinators unite! Eventually.

  2. Create online access

    Online database Statista reports that Millennials (age 24-35 in 2017) have the highest internet usage compared to other age groups. Millennials can check flights, book a hotel or order a pizza through a smart phone. Why isn’t it the same with healthcare?

    Text updates on appointment times are common among some healthcare facilities. Henry Ford Health System is known for texting patients 24 hours before their appointment in order to confirm the time. And while many hospitals have the option to book online, not enough are advertising this information to the public. This is the process most Millennials are familiar with. Not only would this option be more convenient, but it would avoid the hassle of being put on hold over the phone.

  3. Post good reviews

    Popular shopping sites like Amazon have ways to access customer reviews, but healthcare is behind the curve. Reviews for healthcare facilities may already exist on some sites like Yelp, but it would be easier for the patient to go right to the source. Customer reviews on facilities and doctors are a way to gain the patient’s trust, and show them what they should expect. It’s also beneficial for you to see what your patients are saying.

  4. Provide details on mental health

    On college campuses in particular, healthcare providers are focusing on helping students manage physical and mental health. When talking to a Millennial about healthcare, it’s best to include topics like stress and anxiety. For university students, mental health is one of the highest growing issues to date. University Health Services are working to increase the amount of mental healthcare specialists on campus, and to create ads that focus on peace of mind. The University of California, Berkley does an excellent job at this. Their destress tweet is a great way to help promote mental wellbeing. The circle grows and shrinks in time to simulate deep breathing, calming down its viewers on #destressmonday.

    #DestressMonday
  5. Cover their children

    Believe it or not, more and more Millennials are becoming parents. Over 45 percent of Millennials are raising children, according to Iconoculture research. When Millennials are shopping for health insurance, healthcare providers should be prepared to insure not just one person, but a family unit. The issue will only become more common over the next few years. According to a 2013 Gallop poll, 87 percent of childless adults between 18-40 plan on having kids someday. In addition to insuring children, doctors should be prepared to walk Millennials through the process of pregnancy, nursing, and caring for their child.

Millennials differ from previous generations, from finding a healthcare provider to managing their personal needs. By personalizing healthcare for each generation, healthcare providers are able to further understand their patients and optimize treatment for every individual.

For more on healthcare marketing trends and insights, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

From insights to innovation: Applying creativity to connect the dots.

From insights to innovation: Applying creativity to connect the dots.As an advertising creative, my job is to take marketing strategy, marinate it in my brain to cook up fresh, new ideas. I’m a specialist at connecting the dots …making the leap between the empirical, marketing research insights to create the emotional connection that inspires behavior change. So having attended the 2017 Iconosphere conference in Las Vegas this week, getting steeped in current consumer insights in a room of marketing execs and strategists, I gobbled up the breadcrumbs to create my own conclusions. Here they are:

Throw your assumptions out the window.

Before you do a gut check, fact check. I was surprised how when quizzed about Gen We how many assumptions I had were not quite on the money. Like who knew 79% of them are financially cautious? It’s easy to make assumptions. But when you open your mind to alternate realities, you can find new ways in to approach a problem.

Read between the focus groups.

Consumers lie. I never really considered just how much in denial we are of the motivations behind our behaviors. But I learned from keynote speaker, Bob Moesta, that if today’s parents wouldn’t be caught dead driving a minivan, why were over 400,000 minivans sold last year? Sometimes consumer’s desires and actions don’t line up. We create false narratives. As marketers, it’s our job to be aware of the subtext and read between the lines.

Keeping asking “Why?”

Why? Because that is the million-dollar question. It’s where you can strike gold. Don’t settle for what people say they want. Or what shiny, new object you can deliver. Keep digging. Go deeper. Find the problem they want to solve. Find the struggle. That is where new products and ideas come from.

Know thy competition.

It’s not who you think it is. It’s not a product. Or service. Or business. It’s time. It’s effort. It’s busyness. Consumers are busy. In fact, we are 400% more productive than our counterparts in 1950’s. We don’t have time to read. We certainly don’t care about your company. We just have a problem to solve. And you either help us or you don’t. As you design websites, create products and approach problems, consider who you are up against. And how you can help your audience win.

Imagine solutions society can’t.

Humans are wired to habit. We don’t love change. But oh how we love our smart phones. We can’t imagine not having it tethered to us 24/7. Until someone shows us what is next. When we see it, and that tipping point falls, we will jump ship to the next big thing. As soon as you accept the status quo, it will change. So always be on the forefront of what’s next.

So in this blog post, I am actually creating more holes. Taking what we know and opening it up like swiss cheese. And that is exactly the point. Marketing is a minefield. And you have to know where those holes are all around you. Before you fall through or blow up. Navigate knowing you don’t know everything, look for new clues and the breadcrumbs. They will lead you to something truly delicious.

Need more insights? Check out the six things we learned at last year’s Iconosphere.

Weekly Recap - May 12, 2017

Click, scroll, banner image, navigation. Is your website user-friendly? Not only is content key but ease of use it too. According to DMN, content is also about user’s experience on your site. Because let’s face it, if consumers are coming from social or interactive video, they expect good experience. Take a look.

DETAILS, please

UX is content: Content is UX. Calls to action, visuals, navigation buttons. Are these website items pure "content"? Or are they part of a website's user experience (UX)?

Is interactive video the next big thing? 3 creative examples from brands. It's hardly a revelation to say that online video content is phenomenally popular. Millions of words have been written on the subject, and millions more will no doubt follow.

3 ways to make your branded content bingeable. We have become a nation of bingers. Some 70 percent of us binge-watch TV and consume an average of five episodes per session.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Nostalgia marketing is winning with Millennials: How your brand can benefit. Although they’re often viewed as a tech-savvy and forward-thinking generation, Millennials love an excuse to throw it back to the good ol’ days.

6 ways brands are empowering women in 2017. In the first quarter of 2017, brands came together on a very similar mission.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

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6 ways brands are empowering women in 2017.

In the first quarter of 2017, brands came together on a very similar mission, to empower women. According to CEB Iconoculture research, 63 percent of women say obstacles continue to make it harder for women than men today, while only 41 percent of men think women still face obstacles.

To highlight these disparities, here are six ways brands are changing the conversation and empowering women in 2017.

1. Brawny: #StrengthHasNoGender.

Brawny: #StrengthHasNoGender.
(Photo credit: Adweek)

This year, the 43-year-old paper towel brand got a makeover. As part of its Women’s History Month campaign, the brand replaced its trademark lumberjack with a defiant, flannel wearing woman. In an Adweek interview, the agency’s VP of marketing explained, “This year we wanted women to see themselves as strong and resilient, and one way to do that was to show them on the packaging.” Household goods already have a brand advantage with women in the trust department. Who knows where this may take Brawny.

2. Microsoft: Make What’s Next.

The tech brand has recently made it their mission to highlight the growing gap in female STEM (for science, technology, engineering and math) researchers. With their spot “Make What’s Next,” Microsoft encourages young girls to follow their dreams and stay in STEM.

3. McCann: A fearless girl.

McCann: A fearless girl.
(Photo credit: Adweek)

In honor of International Women’s Day, McCann New York erected a statue of a girl facing off the infamous Wall Street Charging Bull. The statue, which has since been removed from site after the permit expired, was to emphasize the power of women in leadership. The girl stood fearlessly in the face of the bull for over a month, serving as a powerful symbol of female strength.

4. Loganberry Books: Gender gap in fiction.

Loganberry Books: Gender gap in fiction.
(Photo credit: Adweek)

To demonstrate the gender gap in fiction, this Ohio bookstore turned all male authored books around in their bookstore so only the works of women were in view. The store operated under this remodel for about a week, as the storeowner wanted to celebrate generations of female authors and inspire the next.    

5. Jack Daniels: His and Hers.

No explanation necessary here.

  1. Ann Taylor: This is Ann.

To celebrate 60 years of business and in honor of Women’s History Month, Ann Taylor debuted their “This is Ann,” video. The minute-long spot highlights the good, the bad and the ugly struggles women have faced throughout the years while thanking the women that have come before them and paved the way.

Are you a woman? We value your thoughts and insights and invite you to join our Brogan Talks to Women Survey.

Weekly Recap - May 5, 2017

Is your brand starting to sound like a robot? Or perhaps you need to build back brand trust? Forbes has three ways your business can show transparency, whilst Adweek is highlighting the common mistakes brands make on social media. Speaking of, Twitter is updating its platform to be more visual. Users can now search by emoji on the social network. What's the taco emoji up to today? Let's see.

DETAILS, please

3 common mistakes brands commit on social. Here are some common mistakes brands are making on social, how to avoid them and how to strengthen your social presence to better connect with your customers.

Twitter's search just got a very important update. Twitter now lets you use emoji characters in search.

3 ways brands can show transparency to build trust. The first step toward improving transparency is recognizing the impact you have on your consumer audience.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Are you keeping up with Brogan & Partners? Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube, Google+ and Pinterest.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

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Weekly Recap - April 28, 2017

Good news for small businesses: 80 percent of consumers surveyed said they have used a search engine to find a local service or product, according to eMarketer. What does that mean exactly? Is it important? Consider seven questions when evaluating the quality of data, so says AdWeek. Notice any good interactive ads lately? Caught you streaming.

DETAILS, please

Most internet users prefer search engines to find local products. If you are an internet user, data shows you are likely to use a search engine to find a local business.

7 questions marketers should consider when weighing the quality of their data. Sets of numbers can be misunderstood if they lack integrity.

Why interactive ads are becoming the norm for streaming platforms. It’s all in the delivery.

The character count guide for blog posts, videos, tweets and more. When it comes to writing text for your blog and social media posts, many marketers wonder, "But what's the character limit?"

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

5 fast facts about Millennials' financial habits. With a median household income of $40,581, Millennials earn 20 percent less than their boomer parents did at the same age.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

Weekly Recap - April 21, 2017

Can a social media platform sweat? Snapchat’s about to find out. Rival Instagram has run away with its Stories app, reaching more than 200 million users a day. Adweek is TV gazing, searcing for the hottest genres and the consumer groups that watch them. Did you know 75 percent of TV watchers are no longer in a committed single-screen relationship? Perhaps it’s time to engage in a multimedia campaign. Native, anyone? Take a look.

DETAILS, please

Should Snapchat be worried about Instagram Stories' success? Instagram Stories is now more popular than the app it cloned.

Infographic: Who’s watching TV’s biggest shows and how their interests align with brands. While digital campaigns can be targeted to consumers with uber-specific interests, television advertising, in comparison, can sometimes feel like a shot in the dark.

Need to supplement your social media marketing? Try native advertising. Brands that use it well have experienced record returns on investment.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

This healthcare system treats patients as valued customers. North Memorial is making sure patients are seen and heard.

Burger King, McDonalds and Google: A lesson in multimedia marketing. What happens when two fast food chains involve Google and personal assistants?

When agency work feels more like a mission. Sounds like social marketing. Meet our latest client crush, Reading Works Detroit. We’re helping them tackle adult illiteracy. You can too.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

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Weekly Recap - April 14, 2017

It’s been nine months since Pokémon Go made its splash on the scene. Now, the mobile game has garnered over 65 million monthly users. Other digital facts this week? According to Adweek, 51 percent of U.S. Snapchat users don’t engage with branded filters or lenses. Shocking. Advertisers, however, shouldn’t fret, Marketing Land is here to remind brands they should measure quality over quantity. Speaking of, how’s your Instagram strategy? Let’s unpack.

DETAILS, please

8 digital marketing stats from last week. Pokémon Go lifts up the hood, and Snapchat's app-installs are a hit.

Mobile engagement just got even more important for marketers. Don't let 'quantity over quality' be the mantra of your mobile-first business plan.

More than a pretty picture: Demystifying Instagram engagement for brands. Building an engagement strategy on Instagram isn’t the guessing game it once was.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

When it's smart to take jabs at the competition. A little competition can be a good thing. Especially when brands engage directly with competitors.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

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