A healthcare marketer's cheat sheet: What to advertise, and when.

A healthcare marketer's cheat sheet: What to advertise, and when.

There always seems to be a “that time of year.” We know all about winter flu season, Heart Month and World Health Day, but what about other ‘seasons’ that healthcare marketers could capitalize on? To be prepared for the next heart attack or baby rush, we’ve compiled a few tips to keep in mind:

Maternity Care

Studies find that the most common time to give birth is from July to September. Contrary to popular belief, the winter months correlate with more conception because people spend more time indoors together. Also, some moms plan for a summer baby to enjoy maternity leave during this desirable time of year. So, July minus nine months brings you to November. This may be an opportune time for your next Maternity campaign.

Surgery

Although patients can never control when they have emergency procedures, there are some times minor surgeries are more convenient than others. For many, December is the opportune time to get the job done. Christmas break is an easy time to fix a torn ligament or pull wisdom teeth, because it’s too chilly for the outdoors (at least in the north) and there’s plenty of time off work to recover. Maybe in your next blog post, suggest some useful tips on how to recover during the holiday season.

Depression

Surprisingly, January is thought to be the most depressing month of the year. With debt from the holidays and the stress of getting back into routine, January is the Monday of the rest of the year. It’s also when Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), triggered by a lack of Vitamin D, is in full swing due to short, sun deprived days. Seems a behavioral health campaign in January makes more sense than the basking-in-the-sun month of July.

ER

There’s always a spike in ER visits during major holidays, like St. Patrick’s Day or even Memorial Day. Some swear by the correlation of a full moon and a busy ER. But for the northern half of the country, the summer months are commonly known as ‘trauma season.’ Hospitals can see ER visits double for children in the summer due to things like bike and rollerblading accidents and bee stings. So, in addition to marketing your Trauma capabilities, there is no better time to talk about child safety than the summer.

Health Insurance

Starting a family means changes in health insurance. And as many would guess, the most popular time to get married is in the summer, from June to September. To prepare for this entourage of new couples, insurance providers should ensure their customers know how to adjust their health insurance.

Traveler’s Insurance

Speaking of insurance, most Americans like taking vacations, and most of them will take them in July. Among those enjoying time off, 51 percent will be leaving their state and nine percent will be going abroad. To prepare for this time, marketers should ensure that patients know how to be covered while away from home. For that nine percent, international health insurance will be a must.

There’s always something in season. Targeted marketing at opportune moments helps to ensure you are reaching your target audience with a relevant message when they need it most.

For more on healthcare marketing trends, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan healthcare checkup.

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How to find a rainbow at the end of a troll storm.

"That's 2017."

This from my 14-year-old daughter, Sofia, in response to my confusion over trolls who litter the Money Diaries website.

Launched in 2016, Money Diaries is a website featuring more than 100 diaries from women who chronicle their spending over a week's time. The writers give an intimate look inside their lives as they share daily choices to work their budgets. Women, mostly Millennial women, are addicted to the site for its authenticity and transparency.

Others love it just to hate it.

Like "Heroic Eye," who wrote this in response to "A Week in New York on a $53,000 Salary:"

"These are not meals. Also, she literally drinks alcohol 6 out of the 7 days she recorded info for this series. There's a hella lot of coffee with not a lot on her stomach (so she can feel awake). And most of the nights she listed, she doesn't get home until 12:30-2:30am (even though the majority of her mornings begin between 7-8am)."

"Fresh Heart" had this to say about the same diary after another reader defended the author.

"Hey — you put it out there in a PUBLIC article, you will get judged. It's not like we're breaking into her apartment and judging her. She wrote it up and published it online for all to read, so shut up. That's asking for judgment."

Blame it on the anonymity of the internet or the juiced up political environment. Whatever the prompt, trolls are inescapable. Even puppies aren't immune. Sofia showed me a YouTube post where a girl proudly introduced her new ball of canine cuddliness. Someone actually accused her of being a cat-hater.

Even puppies aren't safe from trolls.

If puppy posts aren't safe from scrutiny, neither is your brand. If you're on social media or you host a blog, chances are, you've already met a few trolls.

Campbell's sparked a troll frenzy after featuring a real-life gay couple and their toddler son in an ad. A woman named Jessica from the ultra-conservative group "One Million Moms" sparked the feud, posting on Campbell's Facebook page: "I'm so sick of this homosexual agenda, you sell soup… Please take your ad down or you will not have a company anymore!"

Campbell's responded with a statement supporting families of "different configurations, cultures, races and life choices."

Things got really interesting when someone set up a fake Facebook Page "Campbell For Help" to troll the troller. "My word, Jessica. That's quite a leap. While we at Campbell's Kitchen take pride in being empathetic, we are finding it hard to empathize with your vantage point. Would you just prefer we send you some of our classic tomato soup? It's real soup-er?"

Four tactics to tackle trolls.

You can't count on a white knight troll to save your brand from such attacks. So, if you've not already established a plan to manage negative posts, get to it. Your plan should include at least four basic tactics—watch, ignore, engage and employ.

  1. Watch. Take a deep breath and see if any fans come to your defense. There's nothing better than a loyal fan fighting for your honor.

  2. Ignore it. Sometimes the best course of action is to do nothing at all. This is especially true when the troll's comments are especially outlandish. Your followers know the difference between a rant and a true injustice. You're a big brand. You can take a few hits without damaging your reputation. For courage, visit the social media channels of airlines, hospital systems and utility companies. Pacific Gas & Electric didn't engage with the conversation below, however tempting.

  3. Engage with it. When people feel wronged today, they're more likely to post on social media than pick up the phone. If you're in the business of serving customers, your Facebook page is most importantly an extension of your customer service team. Customers expect swift and thoughtful action.

    When your brand is in the wrong, own up to it and use the opportunity to deepen your customer relationships. Kroger gets it. The community managers there are prompt and courteous. The proof is in the posts. Once the team responds, most conversations are wrapped up in a tidy bow. Here's just one of hundreds of recent exchanges:

  4. Learn from it. In addition to vanity metrics—likes, shares, follows—brands should be using social media to manage customer satisfaction and referrals. Your social following is a living, consuming focus group. Use their input to discover flaws and realize opportunities. Find the rainbow at the end of a troll storm. Cue Target.

    When the superstore announced plans to scrub stores of extraneous gender-based signage—boys' toys, girls' bedding, etc.—the trolls marched all over Target's Facebook Page, fuming about political correctness and threatening boycott.

    Target followed up months later with another controversial move, welcoming customers to use the bathroom and fitting room in accordance with their gender identities.The bold move was likely advanced, in part, by the enormous support the retailer received on social after the earlier gender-neutral signage brouhaha. The waters had been tested. They were ready to go full inclusion, knowing full well that it would ignite a vigorous social media debate.

Got a troll nipping at your brand? Use it to the best of your brand's ability. Need help managing your social media channels? These apps are a good start.

5 things Millennials want from healthcare.

America’s largest cohort is no longer a bunch of texting teens. They are adults, adults who are becoming parents and shopping for health insurance. And as Millennials look for healthcare, marketers need to know the best way to reach out to them. These quick facts will help healthcare providers better understand this generation.

  1. Show them how it works

    Millennials value safety more than other generations. They are a more insecure generation, growing up during hard times such as mass shootings and 9/11, according to CEB Iconoculture research. Healthcare providers should be aware of this, and welcome the opportunity to help Millennials through the healthcare process so they feel safe. Many will be buying health insurance for the first time. They will want to know the step-by-step process of purchasing healthcare, along with when to schedule appointments and tips for selecting a physician. Give them an authentic, easy-to-understand approach for this complicated process. Simple, yet relatable ads like Oscar insurance create the intimate feel Millennials are looking for.

    Procrastinators unite! Eventually.

  2. Create online access

    Online database Statista reports that Millennials (age 24-35 in 2017) have the highest internet usage compared to other age groups. Millennials can check flights, book a hotel or order a pizza through a smart phone. Why isn’t it the same with healthcare?

    Text updates on appointment times are common among some healthcare facilities. Henry Ford Health System is known for texting patients 24 hours before their appointment in order to confirm the time. And while many hospitals have the option to book online, not enough are advertising this information to the public. This is the process most Millennials are familiar with. Not only would this option be more convenient, but it would avoid the hassle of being put on hold over the phone.

  3. Post good reviews

    Popular shopping sites like Amazon have ways to access customer reviews, but healthcare is behind the curve. Reviews for healthcare facilities may already exist on some sites like Yelp, but it would be easier for the patient to go right to the source. Customer reviews on facilities and doctors are a way to gain the patient’s trust, and show them what they should expect. It’s also beneficial for you to see what your patients are saying.

  4. Provide details on mental health

    On college campuses in particular, healthcare providers are focusing on helping students manage physical and mental health. When talking to a Millennial about healthcare, it’s best to include topics like stress and anxiety. For university students, mental health is one of the highest growing issues to date. University Health Services are working to increase the amount of mental healthcare specialists on campus, and to create ads that focus on peace of mind. The University of California, Berkley does an excellent job at this. Their destress tweet is a great way to help promote mental wellbeing. The circle grows and shrinks in time to simulate deep breathing, calming down its viewers on #destressmonday.

    #DestressMonday
  5. Cover their children

    Believe it or not, more and more Millennials are becoming parents. Over 45 percent of Millennials are raising children, according to Iconoculture research. When Millennials are shopping for health insurance, healthcare providers should be prepared to insure not just one person, but a family unit. The issue will only become more common over the next few years. According to a 2013 Gallop poll, 87 percent of childless adults between 18-40 plan on having kids someday. In addition to insuring children, doctors should be prepared to walk Millennials through the process of pregnancy, nursing, and caring for their child.

Millennials differ from previous generations, from finding a healthcare provider to managing their personal needs. By personalizing healthcare for each generation, healthcare providers are able to further understand their patients and optimize treatment for every individual.

For more on healthcare marketing trends and insights, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Healthcare Checkup - May 2017

Are you putting your patients first? North Memorial’s recent campaign puts patients’ concerns and experiences at top of mind. Perhaps virtual reality is more your speed? Or are you preparing to respond to your direct competitors? Here’s everything you need to know.

VITAMIN B&P.

This healthcare system treats patients as valued customers. North Memorial is making sure patients are seen and heard.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

How marketers and users can benefit from virtual reality. Virtual Reality (VR) is becoming one of the largest opportunities using sight and sound to create real experiences without actually being present.

When it's smart to take jabs at the competition. A little competition can be a good thing. Especially when brands engage directly with competitors.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

Is your online presence up to snuff? As more digitally savvy Millennials become patients, they expect ease of use and interactivity when it comes to websites. See here.

Boost your online reputation. In the 21st century, you’re nobody unless you’re somebody online.

Serving the Millennial patient. As the millennial generation enters the workforce and becomes increasingly responsible for buying and accessing healthcare, organizations are gearing up for a new “regime.”

MONTHLY DOSE.

Does your hospital marketing budget have you down? Download our free guide, "How to market your hospital on a tight budget," to learn budget efficient marketing strategies.

Weekly Recap - April 21, 2017

Can a social media platform sweat? Snapchat’s about to find out. Rival Instagram has run away with its Stories app, reaching more than 200 million users a day. Adweek is TV gazing, searcing for the hottest genres and the consumer groups that watch them. Did you know 75 percent of TV watchers are no longer in a committed single-screen relationship? Perhaps it’s time to engage in a multimedia campaign. Native, anyone? Take a look.

DETAILS, please

Should Snapchat be worried about Instagram Stories' success? Instagram Stories is now more popular than the app it cloned.

Infographic: Who’s watching TV’s biggest shows and how their interests align with brands. While digital campaigns can be targeted to consumers with uber-specific interests, television advertising, in comparison, can sometimes feel like a shot in the dark.

Need to supplement your social media marketing? Try native advertising. Brands that use it well have experienced record returns on investment.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

This healthcare system treats patients as valued customers. North Memorial is making sure patients are seen and heard.

Burger King, McDonalds and Google: A lesson in multimedia marketing. What happens when two fast food chains involve Google and personal assistants?

When agency work feels more like a mission. Sounds like social marketing. Meet our latest client crush, Reading Works Detroit. We’re helping them tackle adult illiteracy. You can too.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

This healthcare system treats patients as valued customers.

"I love not knowing exactly how much my visit is going to cost."

"I love being uninformed and totally uninvolved with my healthcare."

"It feels great when my doctor gives me a diagnosis without making eye contact."

Said no one ever. That’s why North Memorial Health has launched a new brand campaign to humanize the healthcare experience for patients. In a series of online videos, the healthcare system addresses patients’ concerns and real-life, relatable experiences with humor.

This healthcare system treats patients as valued customers.

North Memorial Health’s message focuses on ensuring their patients are and continue to be heard.

For more on healthcare marketing trends and insights, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Healthcare Checkup - April 2017

Do consumers’ self-care practices impact their healthcare choices? Today, 90 percent of consumers are already partaking in self-care activities. Could their ad-blocking and scaled-back social presence be a factor? Here’s the scoop.

VITAMIN B&P.

Self-care and what it means for healthcare marketers. You know it is 2017 when you can officially count a glass of wine or reading a good book as part of your self-care routine.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

Facebook and Google are losing the war against ad-blockers. Internet users worldwide had installed ad-blocking software on 616 million mobile devices and desktops by the end of 2016, a 25 percent increase from 2015 (491).

Social media users are scaling back: What this means for your brand. Today, consumers are becoming increasingly aware of and careful about their own and other’s social presence.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

What is your brand doing to promote community health? Did you know 95 percent of consumers say doctors are the most trusted sources for health and wellness information? See what else tops their list.

Next generation of community health. Hospitals and health systems across the country are focusing on community health and creating new ways to improve the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual well-being of all people in our communities.

Infographic: Patient preferences for online healthcare searches. Patients seek trustworthy information, but on their own terms.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Looking to market to all generations but don’t have the budget? Not a problem. There’s one common denominator across each audience. Can you guess what it is? Download our free guide: How to market healthcare to all generations, to learn more.

Weekly Recap - March 10, 2017

Move over Facebook, Vimeo is now adding 360 degree video. But what constitutes a view? A share? A like? Adweek is breaking down what it means to truly measure ads. Us? We’re looking at HubSpot’s list of impressive influencer marketing campaigns. Take a look.

DETAILS, please

Vimeo is adding 360-degree video capabilities. Vimeo announced today it will let creators upload, share and sell 360 video on the platform. They’re hoping this will accelerate adoption of the experiential format. 

How to get the true measure of a mobile ad. And how should advertisers incorporate likes and shares in social media?

10 impressive examples of influencer marketing campaigns. You can't go anywhere these days without hearing about the elusive, purportedly mystical powers of influencer marketing.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Facebook and Google are losing the war against ad-blockers. All told, internet users worldwide had installed ad-blocking software on 616 million mobile devices and desktops by the end of 2016, a 25 percent increase from 2015 (491). 

Self-care and what it means for healthcare marketers. You know it is 2017 when you can officially count a glass of wine or reading a good book as part of your self-care routine

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest, greatest and free whitepaper "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

Healthcare Checkup - March 2017

Let's face it, we've all Googled our symptoms before. That rash, pain or cough. According to Google, 1 percent of queries are symptom related. That's millions of searches surrounding symptoms and signs of illness. So, what does this mean for your practice or hospital? Let's break it down.

VITAMIN B&P.

How to get more patients to try telemedicine. Patients consult Google pretty regularly for healthcare advice.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

Snapchat vs. Instagram: Everything your brand needs to know. Debating which visual social platform is better for your brand? Let's break it down filter-by-filter, post-by-post, percentage-by-percentage.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

Is there something we should be learning from children's hospitals? And do you know how to empower patients, while also keeping their information private and secure? See here.

Children's hospitals form partnerships to boost revenue, serve more patients. With all the changes happening in the current healthcare climate, hospitals looking to thrive must take unique approaches to their operations.

How to make patient empowerment a reality. Patient empowerment promises to help improve medical outcomes while lowering treatment costs.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest, greatest and free whitepaper "Communicating with Visuals."

Self-care and what it means for healthcare marketers.

Self-care and what it means for healthcare marketers.

You know it is 2017 when you can officially count a glass of wine or reading a good book as part of your self-care routine.

But, what does self-care really mean? According to CEB Iconoculture research, self-care encompasses the mental, physical, emotional and spiritual activities consumers engage in to enhance their overall health.

Self-care is a want.

Today, 90 percent of consumers are already partaking in self-care activities. In fact, consumers across generations are deeming self-care as a necessity:

  • 59 percent of Matures
  • 47 percent of Boomers
  • 54 percent of Gen X
  • 49 percent of Millennials

In looking at values on the rise for these consumer groups, CEB Iconoculture research suggests that "health," "relaxation" and "comfort" have all seen increases within the past five years. Conversation surrounding self-care has also seen a dramatic shift. In 2008, people associated words such as: health, home, nurse, treatment, medicine, doctor, etc. with self-care. In 2015, consumers accounted for a much broader association, with words like: life, people, work, writing, family, friends, love, book, talk, etc.

Self-care: blending of healthy and non-healthy behaviors.

When it comes to self-care, consumers are considering practices that involve both healthy and non-healthy activities. In addition to going to the gym, to yoga or getting their annual checkup, consumers are also indulging in non-healthy behaviors. Perhaps it's indulging with a cupcake or paczki. Binge watching the latest series added to Netflix, or even going to the movies. Did we mention having a glass of wine? All of these activities fall under the umbrella of self-care and touch on the mental, physical, emotion and spiritual practices consumers are involved with.

Per CEB Iconoculture research, 71 percent of U.S consumers view mental and physical health as closely linked and don't separate them when engaging in self-care activities. Across the generations, 60 percent of Millennials, 76 percent of Xers and 71 percent of Boomers agree with the previous statement.

What this means for your brand.

The self-care notion isn't new. For years there has been a blurring of "health" and "wellness" and what it means to consumers. Brands getting it right are acknowledging consumers' struggles, acknowledging genders and generations.

For more on healthcare marketing trends and insights, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Interested in marketing healthcare to the generations? Download our free guide.

Weekly Recap - March 3, 2017

Pick up. Pick up. Pick up. Wondering why consumers aren't answering your calls? It's because all that ringing is freaking them out. Especially the young'uns. Or they're too busy clipping coupons and hunting for bargains. That goes double for the multicultural shopper. If you're targeting Gen X, you can probably bet they're not at the gym. Or the doctor's office. The sandwich generation would rather preserve youth with Botox than pump iron. Let's unpack.

DETAILS, please

Hold my calls. A 2011 Pew Research study found that the average person made or received about a dozen calls per day; in 2015, that number dropped by nearly half. Young adults say phone calls make them feel "nervous" and "panicked."

Multicultural consumers are savvy shoppers. Multicultural consumers spend more hours on average clipping coupons and searching for deals than general-market consumers, according to the 2016 Valassis RedPlum Purse String Survey. Latinos are the biggest coupon searchers. 

Gen Xers invest more in beauty than health.  Gen Xers are more likely to spend money on anti-aging products and services than exercise regularly, according to the MDVIP Health & Longevity Survey. Only 50 percent of Gen Xers have had a checkup in the past five years, compared with 72 percent of Boomers.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Snapchat vs. Instagram: Everything your brand needs to know. Debating which visual social platform is better for your brand? Let's break it down filter-by-filter, post-by-post, percentage-by-percentage.

How to get more patients to try telemedicine. Telemedicine is at a tipping point. The medical community is on board. Patients say they're in to it. So, why are they so reluctant to use it? Here are four ways to increase patient adoption.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest, greatest and free whitepaper "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

How to get more patients to try telemedicine.

How to get more patient to try telemedicine.

Patients consult Google pretty regularly for healthcare advice. (Doctors love it.)

How regularly? About 1 percent of Google searches are symptom-related. That’s millions of queries about colds, fevers and mysterious rashes, among other ailments. And millions of patients self-diagnosing largely based on blogs, native advertising and user-generated content.

According to the latest national Pew Research study, 72 percent of adult internet users say they have searched online for information about a range of health issues, the most popular being specific diseases and treatments. And 26 percent say they have read or watched someone else’s health experience about health or medical issues in the past 12 months. Finally, 16 percent have gone online in the past 12 months to find others who share the same health concerns.

The medical community has responded with telemedicine, meeting patients in the comfort and convenience of their homes. Still, patients have been slow to adapt.

In the recent “2016 Connected Patient Report” Salesforce found that 91 percent of U.S. adults with health insurance and a primary care provider are only using traditional forms of communication when consulting their doctors. But 62 percent of respondents said they’re open to virtual care treatments instead of in-office appointments for non-urgent issues.

Consumers will eventually adapt to telemedicine, whether out of need or convenience. Medical providers can hasten the process by positioning telemedicine as an extension of patient care, building trust by exposure and experience. Here are four ways to get started.

Make it relevant

The convenience of telemedicine makes it especially appealing to young mothers, the elderly and those who live in rural areas. Mom doesn’t want to take her sick child outdoors. Grandpa has limited access to transportation. And nobody wants to drive 20 miles to have a cold diagnosed. This is your immediate target audience. Connect with them by using messages that most connect with their healthcare hurdles.

Make it tangible

Insurance cards are a symbol of coverage. They make the intangible tangible. The card itself has little worth, but it means a great deal to the card holder. Access. Treatment. Health. Livelihood. I recently switched health insurance and was disappointed when I received my new card in the mail. It’s flimsy, bendable even—not unlike the former hard plastic version that I had long trusted.

So, make a card for your telemedicine service. Not a mousepad or a refrigerator magnet, but a sturdy symbol that will feel at home next to a driver’s license and debit card. This tangible reminder will help patients gain confidence in virtual care.  

Make it part of the office environment

Telemedicine still seems very George Jetson, especially for those who remember the Jetsons. Demonstrate the technology with patients who come in for office visits. Show them how to access the service from their phone, desktop and tablet. Show them what’s behind the proverbial curtain. If the visit requires a follow-up appointment and the channel is appropriate, suggest the next appointment take place virtually. Then send them home with the aforementioned card.

Make it simple

Remember you’re inviting a wide range of patients with varying degrees of tech-savvy to use telemedicine. Make sure that the patient journey is easy to navigate. Build user confidence with supporting content, like blogs, short video tutorials, infographics and testimonials. Then chat it up on your social channels.

Telemedicine is at a tipping point, but patients aren’t likely to change their way of accessing their physician with a lot of guidance along the way. You conquered patient-centered health care. You got this.

Interested in more blogs about healthcare tech? Learn about an app for the flu.

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