Weekly Recap - March 10, 2017

Move over Facebook, Vimeo is now adding 360 degree video. But what constitutes a view? A share? A like? Adweek is breaking down what it means to truly measure ads. Us? We’re looking at HubSpot’s list of impressive influencer marketing campaigns. Take a look.

DETAILS, please

Vimeo is adding 360-degree video capabilities. Vimeo announced today it will let creators upload, share and sell 360 video on the platform. They’re hoping this will accelerate adoption of the experiential format. 

How to get the true measure of a mobile ad. And how should advertisers incorporate likes and shares in social media?

10 impressive examples of influencer marketing campaigns. You can't go anywhere these days without hearing about the elusive, purportedly mystical powers of influencer marketing.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Facebook and Google are losing the war against ad-blockers. All told, internet users worldwide had installed ad-blocking software on 616 million mobile devices and desktops by the end of 2016, a 25 percent increase from 2015 (491). 

Self-care and what it means for healthcare marketers. You know it is 2017 when you can officially count a glass of wine or reading a good book as part of your self-care routine

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest, greatest and free whitepaper "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

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Healthcare Checkup - March 2017

Let's face it, we've all Googled our symptoms before. That rash, pain or cough. According to Google, 1 percent of queries are symptom related. That's millions of searches surrounding symptoms and signs of illness. So, what does this mean for your practice or hospital? Let's break it down.

VITAMIN B&P.

How to get more patients to try telemedicine. Patients consult Google pretty regularly for healthcare advice.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

Snapchat vs. Instagram: Everything your brand needs to know. Debating which visual social platform is better for your brand? Let's break it down filter-by-filter, post-by-post, percentage-by-percentage.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

Is there something we should be learning from children's hospitals? And do you know how to empower patients, while also keeping their information private and secure? See here.

Children's hospitals form partnerships to boost revenue, serve more patients. With all the changes happening in the current healthcare climate, hospitals looking to thrive must take unique approaches to their operations.

How to make patient empowerment a reality. Patient empowerment promises to help improve medical outcomes while lowering treatment costs.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest, greatest and free whitepaper "Communicating with Visuals."

Self-care and what it means for healthcare marketers.

Self-care and what it means for healthcare marketers.

You know it is 2017 when you can officially count a glass of wine or reading a good book as part of your self-care routine.

But, what does self-care really mean? According to CEB Iconoculture research, self-care encompasses the mental, physical, emotional and spiritual activities consumers engage in to enhance their overall health.

Self-care is a want.

Today, 90 percent of consumers are already partaking in self-care activities. In fact, consumers across generations are deeming self-care as a necessity:

  • 59 percent of Matures
  • 47 percent of Boomers
  • 54 percent of Gen X
  • 49 percent of Millennials

In looking at values on the rise for these consumer groups, CEB Iconoculture research suggests that "health," "relaxation" and "comfort" have all seen increases within the past five years. Conversation surrounding self-care has also seen a dramatic shift. In 2008, people associated words such as: health, home, nurse, treatment, medicine, doctor, etc. with self-care. In 2015, consumers accounted for a much broader association, with words like: life, people, work, writing, family, friends, love, book, talk, etc.

Self-care: blending of healthy and non-healthy behaviors.

When it comes to self-care, consumers are considering practices that involve both healthy and non-healthy activities. In addition to going to the gym, to yoga or getting their annual checkup, consumers are also indulging in non-healthy behaviors. Perhaps it's indulging with a cupcake or paczki. Binge watching the latest series added to Netflix, or even going to the movies. Did we mention having a glass of wine? All of these activities fall under the umbrella of self-care and touch on the mental, physical, emotion and spiritual practices consumers are involved with.

Per CEB Iconoculture research, 71 percent of U.S consumers view mental and physical health as closely linked and don't separate them when engaging in self-care activities. Across the generations, 60 percent of Millennials, 76 percent of Xers and 71 percent of Boomers agree with the previous statement.

What this means for your brand.

The self-care notion isn't new. For years there has been a blurring of "health" and "wellness" and what it means to consumers. Brands getting it right are acknowledging consumers' struggles, acknowledging genders and generations.

For more on healthcare marketing trends and insights, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Interested in marketing healthcare to the generations? Download our free guide.

Weekly Recap - March 3, 2017

Pick up. Pick up. Pick up. Wondering why consumers aren't answering your calls? It's because all that ringing is freaking them out. Especially the young'uns. Or they're too busy clipping coupons and hunting for bargains. That goes double for the multicultural shopper. If you're targeting Gen X, you can probably bet they're not at the gym. Or the doctor's office. The sandwich generation would rather preserve youth with Botox than pump iron. Let's unpack.

DETAILS, please

Hold my calls. A 2011 Pew Research study found that the average person made or received about a dozen calls per day; in 2015, that number dropped by nearly half. Young adults say phone calls make them feel "nervous" and "panicked."

Multicultural consumers are savvy shoppers. Multicultural consumers spend more hours on average clipping coupons and searching for deals than general-market consumers, according to the 2016 Valassis RedPlum Purse String Survey. Latinos are the biggest coupon searchers. 

Gen Xers invest more in beauty than health.  Gen Xers are more likely to spend money on anti-aging products and services than exercise regularly, according to the MDVIP Health & Longevity Survey. Only 50 percent of Gen Xers have had a checkup in the past five years, compared with 72 percent of Boomers.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Snapchat vs. Instagram: Everything your brand needs to know. Debating which visual social platform is better for your brand? Let's break it down filter-by-filter, post-by-post, percentage-by-percentage.

How to get more patients to try telemedicine. Telemedicine is at a tipping point. The medical community is on board. Patients say they're in to it. So, why are they so reluctant to use it? Here are four ways to increase patient adoption.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest, greatest and free whitepaper "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

How to get more patients to try telemedicine.

How to get more patient to try telemedicine.

Patients consult Google pretty regularly for healthcare advice. (Doctors love it.)

How regularly? About 1 percent of Google searches are symptom-related. That’s millions of queries about colds, fevers and mysterious rashes, among other ailments. And millions of patients self-diagnosing largely based on blogs, native advertising and user-generated content.

According to the latest national Pew Research study, 72 percent of adult internet users say they have searched online for information about a range of health issues, the most popular being specific diseases and treatments. And 26 percent say they have read or watched someone else’s health experience about health or medical issues in the past 12 months. Finally, 16 percent have gone online in the past 12 months to find others who share the same health concerns.

The medical community has responded with telemedicine, meeting patients in the comfort and convenience of their homes. Still, patients have been slow to adapt.

In the recent “2016 Connected Patient Report” Salesforce found that 91 percent of U.S. adults with health insurance and a primary care provider are only using traditional forms of communication when consulting their doctors. But 62 percent of respondents said they’re open to virtual care treatments instead of in-office appointments for non-urgent issues.

Consumers will eventually adapt to telemedicine, whether out of need or convenience. Medical providers can hasten the process by positioning telemedicine as an extension of patient care, building trust by exposure and experience. Here are four ways to get started.

Make it relevant

The convenience of telemedicine makes it especially appealing to young mothers, the elderly and those who live in rural areas. Mom doesn’t want to take her sick child outdoors. Grandpa has limited access to transportation. And nobody wants to drive 20 miles to have a cold diagnosed. This is your immediate target audience. Connect with them by using messages that most connect with their healthcare hurdles.

Make it tangible

Insurance cards are a symbol of coverage. They make the intangible tangible. The card itself has little worth, but it means a great deal to the card holder. Access. Treatment. Health. Livelihood. I recently switched health insurance and was disappointed when I received my new card in the mail. It’s flimsy, bendable even—not unlike the former hard plastic version that I had long trusted.

So, make a card for your telemedicine service. Not a mousepad or a refrigerator magnet, but a sturdy symbol that will feel at home next to a driver’s license and debit card. This tangible reminder will help patients gain confidence in virtual care.  

Make it part of the office environment

Telemedicine still seems very George Jetson, especially for those who remember the Jetsons. Demonstrate the technology with patients who come in for office visits. Show them how to access the service from their phone, desktop and tablet. Show them what’s behind the proverbial curtain. If the visit requires a follow-up appointment and the channel is appropriate, suggest the next appointment take place virtually. Then send them home with the aforementioned card.

Make it simple

Remember you’re inviting a wide range of patients with varying degrees of tech-savvy to use telemedicine. Make sure that the patient journey is easy to navigate. Build user confidence with supporting content, like blogs, short video tutorials, infographics and testimonials. Then chat it up on your social channels.

Telemedicine is at a tipping point, but patients aren’t likely to change their way of accessing their physician with a lot of guidance along the way. You conquered patient-centered health care. You got this.

Interested in more blogs about healthcare tech? Learn about an app for the flu.

Healthcare Checkup - February 2017

Out–are the days of looking good and in–are the days of feeling good, finally. Brands are taking a new approach to reach consumers looking to benefit their health. Today, consumers are looking for more relatable messages and attainable goals. They’re also looking to take a break from some of their social media feeds. But not after they indulge in a Facebook 360 Live video, of course. Let’s take a look.  

VITAMIN B&P.

Why brands are discovering new ways to advertise to fitness consumers. Look good, feel good? Consumers today might have proven that motivational message no longer effective.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

Deseat.me: A digital disappearance. Are consumers really looking to go off the grid? Are we in the beginning stages of a digital disappearance?

Facebook 360 Live: From a marketer’s view. 360 video is nothing new to the social world, but 360 video in real time is new to the world of Facebook.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

Looking to go beyond treating with a pill, healthcare firms are turning to mobile apps to help their patients. And if its personalized messaging, all the better. See here.

Moving beyond the pill in the healthcare sector. For the past several years, healthcare and pharma firms have been trying, with mixed success, to step up their beyond-the-pill programs.

Infographic: How to personalize patient marketing. The start of a positive patient experience begins with a consistent communication strategy.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Does your hospital marketing budget have you down? Download our free guide, "How to market your hospital on a tight budget," to learn budget efficient marketing strategies.

Healthcare Checkup - January 2017

Have you made your New Year’s resolution yet? Don’t fret, now’s a good time to reflect on the previous year. And 2016 was quite a year. Not only was it big for social media platforms (Instagram stories anyone?) but it was a monumental year for consumers. So much so, that some are drastically shifting their values in 2017. Take a look.

VITAMIN B&P.

Hospital system backs patient experience with refund policy. Patients increasingly want the same level of customer service at the hospital that they get at the Genius Bar, according to McKinsey & Company research.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

A year in review: Facebook. Every year brings advancements and enhancements—and 2016 was no different.

Instagram: 2016 year in review. 2016 was another very big year for the visual-based platform. In case you missed it, we present Instagram’s most snap-worthy moments of 2016.

5 consumer trends every marketer should know in 2017. Not only was 2016 a rough year, but it reshaped consumer values for 2017. Take a look.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

When it comes to content marketing, Ragan has a few tips to craft a great health story. And hospitals take heed, Medicare is watching.

It’s not brain surgery: How to tell a great health story. If you haven't done your time in the ranks of a newsroom before moving to PR, here are five simple steps from a health-reporter-turned-PR-pro.

Watch out, hospitals: Medicare’s planning to punish you if you misbehave. Pay-for-performance is here to stay. Hospitals better pay attention.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Looking to market to all generations but don’t have the budget? Not a problem. There’s one common denominator across each audience. Can you guess what it is? Download our free guide: How to market healthcare to all generations, to learn more.

Hospital system backs patient experience with refund policy.

Hospital system backs patient experience with refund policy

Patients increasingly want the same level of customer service at the hospital that they get at the Genius Bar, according to McKinsey & Company research.

Respondents said that great customer service was just as important to them in non-healthcare and healthcare companies alike. Other qualities that ranked as important for both were delivering on expectations, making life easier and offering great value.

Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania is on board. Earlier this year, the hospital launched a system-wide money back policy on patient care—with no-questions asked, no strings attached and no red tape applied. Patients can even download the Geisinger ProvenExperience app to set the process in motion.

Dissatisfied with your post-op meal? The finance department bungled your payment schedule? Difficulty scheduling tests? Encountered a rude receptionist? Felt neglected or burdensome? All of these patient experiences and more qualify for reimbursement under Geisinger’s policy. The only caveat? Refunds can only be applied to co-payments and deductibles.

“We want to make sure we not only have the right care that is high quality and safe, but we also want to make sure our care is compassionate, dignified and delivered with a lot of kindness,” Geisinger President & CEO David Feinberg told the Washington Post.

Seizing highly emotional, high performance moments.

Highly emotional, high performance opportunities are the stuff customer loyalty is made of, according to McKinsey studies into the retail banking industry. Researchers found that routine transactions, like buying traveler’s checks, do little to create an emotional bond with customers. But critical moments, like awaiting a response on a loan or releasing a check from hold, can forge deeper, more meaningful (read: profitable) relationships.

After a positive experience, more than 85 percent of customers increased their value to the bank by purchasing more products or investing more of their assets. And more than 70 percent reduced their commitment when their problem was not resolved to their satisfaction.

Geisinger processes an average 122 refunds a month stemming from appointment scheduling to access of care and billing concerns. Refunds have ranged from $20 to a couple thousand dollars. Meanwhile, customer relations are improving. According to CEB Iconoculture research, communication between patients and patient advocates has increased nearly 25 percent.

This will likely bode well for the system on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Survey front. The survey measures patients’ perceptions of their hospital experience and publishes results quarterly for all to see.  Respondents are interviewed six weeks or less after discharge—plenty of time for Geisinger to process a refund request.

For more on healthcare marketing trends, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Healthcare Checkup - December 2016

Tis the season for giving, forging connections and the flu? Yes, that’s right. Let’s take a look.

Give: Rethink Breast Cancer has created thoughtful Give-A-Care products to gift one-by-one or send curated packages to loved ones diagnosed with breast cancer.

Connections: Celebrity endorsements may seem like a trend of the past, but they are still used in several marketing campaigns today. And believe it or not, Millennials are sticking with their pediatricians well into adulthood.

Flu: While the flu season is in full swing, Uber is making it more convenient for consumers interested in receiving the flu shot. See here.

VITAMIN B&P.

Rethink Breast Cancer makes it easy to show you care. The young women’s breast cancer movement has created thoughtful Give-A-Care products that help friends diagnosed with breast cancer get through the tough time ahead.

Healthcare marketing: Do celebrities still resonate? As we’ve recently seen in the latest Cigna TV spot, celebrities definitely capture our attention. (Especially when Dr. McDreamy is talking to us.) But, does this marketing tactic still resonate?

Millennials are sticking with pediatricians into adulthood. From 2002 to 2012, pediatric office visits by patients 19 and older grew from less than a million to 2.4 million.

Flu season driving you nuts? There's an app for that: #UberForHealth. The ride-sharing enterprise advertised their new promotional effort.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

Everything marketers need to know about paid search. How many times have you searched for something online? How many of those times did you search from your mobile device?

INDUSTRY PULSE.

From #GivingTuesday to patient centered storytelling, social media has seen quite the transformation this year. Take a look.

Healthcare embraces #GivingTuesday with innovative fundraising. With momentum on social media and a partnership with the United Nations Foundation, #GivingTuesday has quickly become a vast philanthropic effort led by Millennials.

How healthcare marketers use social media. Gamification. Disruption. Value-based messaging. See how healthcare marketers can tap into social media to share their brand message.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Does your hospital marketing budget have you down? Download our free guide, "How to market your hospital on a tight budget," to learn budget efficient marketing strategies.

Weekly Recap - November 18, 2016

Is it us or is it beginning to look a lot like the holidays already? Otherwise known as “Christmas Creep,” marketers are already debuting their holiday ads, deals and marketing campaigns for the season. From Starbucks’ red cups to Macy’s “Believe” campaign, HubSpot has compiled the most memorable holiday marketing campaigns that continue to leave an impact on consumers. Speaking of, what will they want in an online shopping experience? Will virtual assistants play a role? Let’s take a look.

DETAILS, please

150 years of the best holiday marketing campaigns. The holiday season remains one of the more influential times of year to launch a campaign and seal it into holiday memory for years to come.

Infographic: What consumers want most in an online shopping experience. The holiday shopping season is upon us. Is your brand ready?

Will virtual assistances assist consumers this holiday season? Consumers are frequently turning to virtual assistants like Siri and Alexa to help with a variety of things. Is holiday shopping one of them?

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Flu season driving you nuts? There's an app for that: #UberForHealth. The campaign was designed to deliver flu care packages and flu shots for up to five individuals from a registered nurse through Passport Health, for free. 

Millennials are sticking with pediatrician into adulthood. From 2002 to 2012, pediatric office visits by patients 19 and older grew from less than a million to 2.4 million.

How to work the holidays like a brand star. How can brands leverage the holidays to win shoppers? Easy on the Christmas creep, skip Thanksgiving sales and campaign with purpose.

THE Topic of conversation

Authenticity. Discover which brands are getting real and how to market authenticity across genders, generations and ethnic groups. Download our free whitepaper “3 Rules to Creating an Authentic Brand.”

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

Millennials are sticking with pediatrician into adulthood.

Millennials are sticking with pediatrician into adulthood.

My siblings and I didn’t have a pediatrician when we were kids. Everyone in my house saw the family doctor. (Except for daddy, who self-medicated the rare virus with a strict regimen of warm Vernors, Vicks VapoRub and Campbell’s soup.)

So, I’m a little unclear about when kids age out of the system. And I’m a lot reluctant to find out.

I love the pediatrician’s office. The staff and doctors are empathetic, nurturing and wildly responsive. They shoehorn my kids into the schedule on a moment’s notice for even the most trivial ailment. And they never judge, no matter how many common colds you confuse for bird flu or whooping cough.

I assumed it would be my kids who would eventually insist on graduating to an adult office. Maybe not.

I took my 15-year-old son for a pediatric visit recently that I thought might be our last. His tall, lanky frame loomed large over miniature chairs and wooden toys. His size was even more pronounced in the park-themed examination room, surrounded by bright wall murals that served a helpful distraction when he was a fussy toddler.

But he didn’t say a thing. Not a word. He even grabbed a Scooby Doo sticker at check-out and mocked his good fortune.

Could he possibly appreciate the pediatrician’s office as much as I do?

A new survey suggests as much. And it’s not just older Gen We patients who are hesitant to take their medical charts elsewhere. Millennials are lingering longer, according to a National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

From 2002 to 2012, pediatric office visits by patients 19 and older grew from less than a million to 2.4 million. The number is expected to grow even higher under Obamacare as dependents can remain on their parents’ healthcare plan until age 26.

The trend has prompted New York City pediatricians to receive additional training to treat young adults. Dr. David Bell told the New York Times (June 23, 2016) that he’s steadily increased his age cutoff over the years from 24 to 27, 30 and now, 35.

At this rate, Millennials won’t leave the pediatrician until they concede the coveted relationship to their own children.

So what does this trend say about Millennials? That they’re loyal or complacent? Practical or peculiar? Then again, it may all come down to convenience. According to a Pew survey, 18-34 year olds today are more likely to live with a parent than a partner or a spouse for the first time in over a century.

For more on healthcare marketing trends, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Flu season driving you nuts? There's an app for that: #UberForHealth.

Flu season driving you nuts? There's an app for that: #UberForHealth.

UberX. UberXL. BLACK. SUV. UberHEALTH? 

Yes, you read that correctly. UberHEALTH.

On October 25, the ride-sharing enterprise advertised their new promotional effort, #UberForHealth.

When users in participating cities opened the app between 11am and 3pm, Uber’s temporary “HEALTH” option could be selected in attempt to stay well this season. The campaign was designed to deliver flu care packages and flu shots for up to five individuals from a registered nurse through Passport Health, for free. No tricks, no gimmicks, just the tap of a button.

If you are a firm believer in the expression “good things come in threes” this marketing tactic probably appeals to you– free Uber, free care package, and last but certainly not least, free flu shots.

Although the shot is optional, Uber hopes their promotion will encourage users to take control of their health, along with keeping the health of others in mind. As reported by Uber, each year the flu affects 20 percent of the population and receiving the flu shot reduces the risk of passing your germs by 50-60 percent. Uber’s overall goal may be to spread buzz from person to person about the convenient transportation business, but UberHEALTH aspires to do the opposite for viruses and prevent illnesses from circulating.

How this helps Uber.

2016 is not Uber’s first rodeo testing out UberHEALTH. However, unlike last year, everything is free – and to be quite frank, everyone loves free. Uber’s pilot campaign presents users and non-users an incentive to try Uber for reasons other than convenient traveling.  

Even though Uber is merely getting their feet wet in the healthcare pool, we can’t help but wonder what is next? Will they tap into unlimited delivery services? Take over the world? (okay maybe not that far, but you get the idea).

Whatever the next big thing may be, the innovative campaign supports the multibillion dollar company in breaking out of the traditional “Uber box” and encourages more brainstorming on how Uber could ultimately be used. More uses = More business.

How this helps the healthcare industry.  

It’s no secret hospitals are on top of the latest technology in their facilities, but campaigns like UberHealth force innovation outside the hospital walls as well.

Although it may not be ideal to bring the nurse to the patient in every situation, hospitals are taking the idea of convenience integration and running with it. MedStar Health can be seen as a prime example when their partnership with Uber was announced in January 2016  in hopes of helping patients with transportation to and from appointments. According to research provided by BMC Health Services Research, with every patient that does not show up to an appointment, a health organization loses money.

Keeping that in mind, incorporating concepts like transportation services is not only beneficial to the patient, it is also one small step towards the future for healthcare industries.

How this helps you.

Now more than ever, the hours in the day seem to be disappearing and to-do lists are growing. Busy mom, hard-working Millennial, stay-at-home parent, regardless of who you are, everyone strives to master the art of fitting it all in. This year, Uber helped individuals scratch the flu shot off those long lists.

The ride hauling company has been mainly used for getting from point A to point B, but did you ever think to use Uber to receive your seasonal flu shot? Chances are, probably not. For current Uber users and non-users alike, no matter the success of UberHealth, this may possibly encourage you to find new ways to utilize the service for your benefit, even when you never thought you could.

According to DMR research, more than eight million people are consistent Uber users and two billion rides and counting have been taken. With figures like that, it is no wonder why Uber is constantly trying to find new ways to help customers get “more for their ride.” Uber Eats, Uber’s Vote campaign, and Dogs of Uber are models for how Uber is expanding for their own business, but more importantly, for you.

UberHEALTH + Healthcare + You.

Although information has not been released on how successful the pilot campaign has been this year, one thing appears to be evident; innovation is surely in the air – and it appears to be beneficial to all.

Don’t fret – if you missed the chance to try UberHEALTH, there is always next year to give them a “shot” (and they’ll be sure to give you one too!).

For more on healthcare marketing trends, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

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