5 things your hospital should be doing online.

5 things your hospital should be doing online.

Patients today are relying heavily on the internet for health and wellness needs. Is your hospital prepared? Stay ahead of the curve with these five key tactics.

  1. Provide accurate medical information.

    Fact: 59 percent of adults search online for health information. They research symptoms, treatments and weigh the importance of visiting a doctor. Top search engine result pages (or SERPs) for these searches tend to feature Web MD and Mayo Clinic. Whether you ascend to Mayo SERP heights or not, you should enrich your site with helpful content. Medicinenet provides patient-centered medical info anyone can access, including symptoms, treatment options and fast facts on each illness. Start with the most frequently diagnosed ailments and work your way down.

    Provide accurate medical information.

  2. Use chatbots.

    While live chats are managed by living, breathing humans, they are often unable to respond right away and often demand your email to reply later. Chatbots offer similiar benefits of live people without the people. Chatbots answer questions and guide patients along their journey, saving time and money. Use chatbots on your website and on Facebook Messenger to increase customer engagement.

    Use chatbots.

  3. Let patients schedule appointments online.

    It’s not just Millennials who are accustomed to doing things online. In fact, 96 percent of Americans shop on the web. But hospitals have been slow to adapt to the online marketplace. Nobody likes making appointments by phone, so Mayo Clinic and Henry Ford Health System allow patients to request an appointment online. Although it takes up to three days for a response, it’s a big step forward in making the healthcare more online accessible.

    Let patients schedule appointments online.

  4. Optimize social media.

    Your hospital needs a Facebook and Twitter presence. If you want to up your content, you need video. In 2016, the number of video posts per person on Facebook increased by 94 percent in the U.S. The American Heart Association does a great job of posting short videos explaining safety traning procedures and medical terms. See one here. Can’t make a video? Share one.

    While you’re at it, boost engagement. Reach out to your audience though quizzes and polls. It’s also great to collaborate with partners. Tag partner videos and games and share. Everyboydy wins.

    Want more tips? See these infographics on when and how to post the best content.

    Optimize social media.

  5. Get good reviews.

    Easier posted than done. Still, patients reviewing hospitals, treatments, and doctors is a thing (see RateMDs or Healthgrades). If they’re not doing it on your website, they probably should. According to squared media, 58 percent of consumers say that the star rating of a business is the most important factor they consider when making purchases. Instead of tracking down your review on Yelp and Consumer Affairs, why not put them on your website? You may earn trust and referrels along the way.

    Get good reviews.
    Credit: ratemds.com

We know healthcare. For more, follow the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Healthcare Checkup - July 2017

From moms venting on social media to a new ad campaign from The Coalition to Protect America’s Healthcare, we’re seeing lots of messaging about the ACHA. As if those young Millennials don’t have enough to worry about! Check out how to communicate with them as well as through videos, voice activated search, and patient education.

VITAMIN B&P.

Moms use social media to talk health coverage. Seen hashtags like #IAmAPreexisting Condition and #CSection lately? See why some frustration-venting moms are freaking out over proposed ACHA reform and how your brand might help them.

Healthcare marketing: Making privacy a priority for patients. While we love to share steps walked and medical triumphs, we want absolute control over our personal health data. What should your healthcare brand do to reassure that privacy is an absolute?

5 tips to boost video performance. Yes, video is hot, but only well-done video. Check out how you can make your healthcare videos outshine and out-click your competition.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

How to market to young Millennials.  It’s not all YOLO for the young Millennial, as this chronically stressed cohort worries about money, employment, even retirement.  Acknowledging and empathizing with their struggles can benefit your brand.

What you need to know about voice activated search and SEO. 50 percent of all searches will be voice activated by 2020. Is your brand ready?

INDUSTRY PULSE.

The Coalition to Protect America’s HealthCare just launched an ad campaign asking senators to protect the estimated 23 million Americans who could lose coverage under the AHCA. Running in 12 key states, the new TV spot queries, “Am I one of the 23 million? Is my family? My best friend?”

How hospitals use data for patient education. Speaking of personal health data, here’s an infographic that illustrates how to maximize data retrieval via pertinent patient education to boost outcomes.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Looking to market to all generations but don’t have the budget? Not a problem. There’s one common denominator across each audience. Can you guess what it is? Download our free guide: How to market healthcare to all generations, to learn more.

Moms use social media to talk health coverage.

Moms are to Facebook what tweens are to Instagram. It’s where she finds advice, attention and, most importantly, an audience. Torn between two brands? Post it. Kid matriculated to middle school? Share it. Fear of losing coverage for your child’s pre-existing medical condition? Promote it.

According to Nielsen research, Generation X (ages 40-52 in 2017) spends the most time on social media: almost seven hours a week versus Millennials, who come in second, with just over six hours a week. Facebook is mom’s channel of choice, with 81 percent using the platform versus 66 percent of dads. Parents, especially moms, interact with their networks frequently. About 94 percent post or comment Facebook regularly.

What’s she posting? Healthcare is always a hot topic with mom on social. She asks about the shelf life of sunscreen, chronicles her 2 a.m. dash to the ER with her wheezing toddler, and invites debate over the best treatments for poison ivy and bug bites. Changes in health—whether positive or negative—are particularly post worthy.

Like the risk of losing healthcare coverage. The fate of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has moms taking to their worries to social media with hashtags like #IAmAPreexistingCondition and #Csection to vent frustration over losing coverage or higher premiums because they have given birth. Under the American Health Care Act (AHCA)—legislation proposed to replace the ACA—C-sections would be categorized as a pre-existing condition, along with diabetes and congenital heart problems.

Moms are also worried about losing coverage for their families. Some share photos of their children who could die without insurance. Others share their family’s health struggles and openly fret about the impact of policy change.

The ACA/ACHA conversation will continue for months if not years while legislation is considered in Congress. Meanwhile, healthcare will be always be a social media fave. So, what’s a health care provider to do? Participate in the conversation or sit on the sidelines? You may opt to toggle between the two, just don’t ignore mom altogether. She is the undisputed healthcare decision maker in the family. You need her on your side and that means acknowledging her social media activity.

Participate in the conversation.

The topic du jour is the ACA. If you’re a health care provider, chances are your physicians and nurses are already entertaining questions from patients about the ACA. Will I be covered? Will I have to pay more? Your role is to be informative without being political. It may be a tough line to walk, but if you’re not careful you’ll alienate some patients.

Develop a social media plan to keep your team on track. Stick to the hard facts and avoid rumor and innuendo. Your job is to interpret the current policy, not analyze what the impact of proposed legislation. Provide helpful tips and insights into how to use insurance benefits to their full advantage. If and when new legislation is adopted, articulate what if any impact they may experience. Be a guide, a trusted resource that mom can lean on.

Sit on the sidelines.

Just because you can’t contribute to the politics of the day doesn’t mean you should ignore it altogether. Your social media team should monitor the healthcare conversation regularly, providing insights into how consumers are reacting. Think of it as a dynamic, diverse focus group. When people complain of stress, consider content to help families cope in positive ways (yoga, meditation, long walks, etc.). If you work directly with patients, this knowledge will help your team communicate more authentically with them.

In short, mom is freaking out about healthcare coverage right now. She’s commiserating with millions of her compatriots very publicly via her favorite social media channel, Facebook.  If you want to build trust and loyalty with mom, pay attention to what’s keeping her up at night and posting at all hours of the day.

5 tips to boost video performance.

5 tips to boost video performance.

You don’t need to do research to know that videos are going viral. Ranging from 10 seconds to three minutes, informational videos communicating core concepts to viewers are popping up all over the place. And for good reason: consumers are more likely to share a video than a blog. Yet it isn’t good enough just to have content, it has to be good. Bad content can do more damage than no content at all. Here are five tips to get clicks and make your video content shine.

  1. Be brief throughout.

    Two to three minutes should be plenty. Know that brevity goes beyond the total length. While the video itself should be short, internal facts and sections should also be brief. No one needs a minute, or even 30 seconds of a talking head. Keep short cuts of relevant information, and switch up your info with cuts of B roll or go on to the next fact. Lingering will only lose viewers.

  2. Tell, don’t sell.

    Your audience knows when they’re being pitched to. For example, a video on healthcare shouldn’t boast about how great your hospital is. It’s one-sided communication and may appear conceited. Instead, tell consumers what they want to know. Explaining medical procedures in a unique, simplified manner will help avoid selling yourself too hard. And with healthcare, there’s a lot to explain. Quickies on different procedures, choosing a doctor or purchasing insurance will do better. When patients have questions, video presents a great opportunity to deliver the answers first hand. Remember to not just feature yourself, but your audience. A recent study suggests that consumers value a patient-centered approach to healthcare. This can be done through featuring patient interviews and showing the doctor-patient relationship. Your audience will be able to see themselves through the screen.

  3. Keep style simple.

    The style of your video should not only reflect the content, but your audience. Think about why your audience wants to view the content. Is it out of necessity, research, entertainment, or just curiosity? Your style should reflect the answer. Generally speaking, a simple and straightforward style will strike viewers who don’t want to be overwhelmed. Like any form of communication, videos that connect on a personal level are typically winners.

  4. Know when to use live action vs. animation.

    Animation and live action are two different animals in the video world. For live action, quality sound and lighting keeps things professional. It’s also great to focus on the people in your video. For entertainment purposes, AdWeek suggests modeling your video after a film or documentary.

    On the flipside, there’s the possibility of animation. We have the unconscious connection in our minds that drawn ad equals simple. Animation also gives you more power over your style, tone and transitions. This American Heart Association video illustrates the beauty of a simplified message via well-conceived, effective animation.

    So how do you know what’s best for your video? If your ad features talking, show the person. But if your focus is statistics or directions, animation may be best.

  5. Have accurate representation.

    Both Millennials and Boomers want to see themselves as equal members of society. Boomers don’t want to be isolated as the old, wrinkled people on TV. In fact, the Pew Research Center reported that 64 percent of them are on a social media site. In your videos, make sure you don’t single them out. Show Boomers as a part of society, blended among a variety of age groups who are tech savvy and able to function online.

    Millennials enjoy ads from real people. This may not be an expert, but someone who is genuine to the audience. Going back to healthcare, instead of doctors talking about how great a procedure is, consumers will want to hear from patients. Show them a face they will relate to.

Wanna know more about web content? Check out more Brogan blogs on what you need to know about voice activated search and SEO and the pros and cons of snapchat.

 

Weekly Recap - June 9, 2017

Can you blog with the big dogs? Is your content cutting it? Maybe your headlines are holding you back. Or your CTA is b-a-d. HubSpot has some ideas. Video! That’s what we thought. If you’re thinking of taking your social pages there, pro tips are a good place to start. Competitors creeping on your prospects with paid search? Learn how to stand your ground. Like Facebook.

DETAILS, Please

The anatomy of a perfect blog post. Even though we all are crunched for time, spouting off a mediocre blog post for the sake of hitting a deadline isn't worth it.

How to easily create professional-looking videos for 4 popular social media platforms. Video is dominating social media marketing. In fact, experts predict video will account for 80% of global internet traffic by 2019. So now is the best time to master the medium.

How to deal with competitors targeting your brand terms. When it comes to branded bidding wars on Google paid search, things can turn real nasty.

Facebook advertising 2017: Five factors that could rein in future growth. Since 2012, News Feed ads have been the center of Facebook’s business. But the number of ads the company can show there is approaching its upper limit.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

To snap or not to snap: the pros and cons of Snapchat. Is Snapchat right for you? Consider the pros and cons.

What you need to know about voice activated search and SEO. Just when you thought you had the whole SEO thing down, the internet shifts to voice activation search.

Healthcare Checkup - June 2017. How can healthcare providers tap into the safety Millennials so crave?

Healthcare marketing: Making privacy a priority for patients. Today, is the age of Facebook and Fitbits. Tracking and tweeting. But yet, when it comes to healthcare, patients still want privacy – but on their own terms.

THE Topic of conversation

Millennials - Millennials. Discover who Millennials are, why it’s important to market to them, and how you can increase brand loyalty and engagement. Download our free whitepaper “8 Rules of Marketing to Millennials.”

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

Healthcare marketing: Making privacy a priority for patients.

Privacy. What was once the norm is now a luxury. Today, is the age of Facebook and Fitbits. Tracking and tweeting. But yet, when it comes to healthcare, patients still want privacy – but on their own terms.

Yes, patients post to social media to share their miles walked. Their cancer remissions. Their medical triumphs. But when it comes to their personal data, patients are very selective over who gets to see what. According to CEB Iconoculture research, when patients were polled on what terms they associate with healthcare, privacy ranked number one:

Healthcare marketing: Making privacy a priority for patients.

Last year alone, two-thirds of consumers shared personal health data via wearable devices, apps or websites. So why is this different? Patients have the ultimate control over their own personal data. With recent discrepancies in regulations of other people having access to patient portals, makes consumers uncomfortable with the lack of control over their personal data.

What should your healthcare brand do?

  1. Make privacy a priority with patients. Let them know upfront what parties will have access to their data, when consulting with other physicians, hospitals, etc.
  2. Be transparent with medical notes. No one wants a doctor that isn’t in their court. Some are even turning to OpenNotes, a system that allows patients access to their doctor’s medical notes, to increase transparency and garner trust.
  3. Not all patients are created equal. Just because some demographics or generations have similar media habits and a social media presence, doesn’t mean all of these consumers do. Acknowledge the differences among patients’ privacy needs to better patient relationships and referrals.

For more information on healthcare industry trends, sign up for our Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Healthcare Checkup - June 2017

How can healthcare providers tap into the safety Millennials so crave? Should you be focusing your mental health campaign at university populations? Or should you stick with the SAD month of January? No worries, as you’ll be happy to see all the ways brands are empowering women.

VITAMIN B&P.

5 things Millennials want from healthcare. No longer a bunch of texting teens, America’s largest cohort is having babies and purchasing healthcare. Take a look at what they’re looking for.

A healthcare marketer’s cheat sheet: what to advertise and when. We all know about flu season and heart month, but what about some other opportune months to market your clinical services?

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

6 top takeaways from Iconosphere 2017. From “play deficit disorder” to a world without smart phones, see what’s up and coming in future-forward ideas and consumer insights shared at this conference.

6 ways brands are empowering women in 2017. Kudos to Microsoft for encouraging young girls to stay in STEM and MCann New York for the statue of the darling girl facing off the infamous Wall Street Charging Bull.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

Have you added influencer marketing to your mix yet? Think maternity care, fitness and bariatrics. And how are your docs feeling about their workplace these days? Have you given them a forum to tell you?

What micro-influencers can do for you. These mid-level brand evangelists are loaded with authenticity and millennial appeal, and may warrant your attention in implementing an influencer campaign.

Here’s what doctors really think about where they work. Gain insight from one doc who appreciates giving his insight on a hospital focus group. Something to think about for physician retention.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Looking to market to all generations but don’t have the budget? Not a problem. There’s one common demoninator across each audience. Can you guess what it is? Download our free guide: How to market healthcare to all generations, to learn more.

A healthcare marketer's cheat sheet: What to advertise, and when.

A healthcare marketer's cheat sheet: What to advertise, and when.

There always seems to be a “that time of year.” We know all about winter flu season, Heart Month and World Health Day, but what about other ‘seasons’ that healthcare marketers could capitalize on? To be prepared for the next heart attack or baby rush, we’ve compiled a few tips to keep in mind:

Maternity Care

Studies find that the most common time to give birth is from July to September. Contrary to popular belief, the winter months correlate with more conception because people spend more time indoors together. Also, some moms plan for a summer baby to enjoy maternity leave during this desirable time of year. So, July minus nine months brings you to November. This may be an opportune time for your next Maternity campaign.

Surgery

Although patients can never control when they have emergency procedures, there are some times minor surgeries are more convenient than others. For many, December is the opportune time to get the job done. Christmas break is an easy time to fix a torn ligament or pull wisdom teeth, because it’s too chilly for the outdoors (at least in the north) and there’s plenty of time off work to recover. Maybe in your next blog post, suggest some useful tips on how to recover during the holiday season.

Depression

Surprisingly, January is thought to be the most depressing month of the year. With debt from the holidays and the stress of getting back into routine, January is the Monday of the rest of the year. It’s also when Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), triggered by a lack of Vitamin D, is in full swing due to short, sun deprived days. Seems a behavioral health campaign in January makes more sense than the basking-in-the-sun month of July.

ER

There’s always a spike in ER visits during major holidays, like St. Patrick’s Day or even Memorial Day. Some swear by the correlation of a full moon and a busy ER. But for the northern half of the country, the summer months are commonly known as ‘trauma season.’ Hospitals can see ER visits double for children in the summer due to things like bike and rollerblading accidents and bee stings. So, in addition to marketing your Trauma capabilities, there is no better time to talk about child safety than the summer.

Health Insurance

Starting a family means changes in health insurance. And as many would guess, the most popular time to get married is in the summer, from June to September. To prepare for this entourage of new couples, insurance providers should ensure their customers know how to adjust their health insurance.

Traveler’s Insurance

Speaking of insurance, most Americans like taking vacations, and most of them will take them in July. Among those enjoying time off, 51 percent will be leaving their state and nine percent will be going abroad. To prepare for this time, marketers should ensure that patients know how to be covered while away from home. For that nine percent, international health insurance will be a must.

There’s always something in season. Targeted marketing at opportune moments helps to ensure you are reaching your target audience with a relevant message when they need it most.

For more on healthcare marketing trends, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan healthcare checkup.

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How to find a rainbow at the end of a troll storm.

"That's 2017."

This from my 14-year-old daughter, Sofia, in response to my confusion over trolls who litter the Money Diaries website.

Launched in 2016, Money Diaries is a website featuring more than 100 diaries from women who chronicle their spending over a week's time. The writers give an intimate look inside their lives as they share daily choices to work their budgets. Women, mostly Millennial women, are addicted to the site for its authenticity and transparency.

Others love it just to hate it.

Like "Heroic Eye," who wrote this in response to "A Week in New York on a $53,000 Salary:"

"These are not meals. Also, she literally drinks alcohol 6 out of the 7 days she recorded info for this series. There's a hella lot of coffee with not a lot on her stomach (so she can feel awake). And most of the nights she listed, she doesn't get home until 12:30-2:30am (even though the majority of her mornings begin between 7-8am)."

"Fresh Heart" had this to say about the same diary after another reader defended the author.

"Hey — you put it out there in a PUBLIC article, you will get judged. It's not like we're breaking into her apartment and judging her. She wrote it up and published it online for all to read, so shut up. That's asking for judgment."

Blame it on the anonymity of the internet or the juiced up political environment. Whatever the prompt, trolls are inescapable. Even puppies aren't immune. Sofia showed me a YouTube post where a girl proudly introduced her new ball of canine cuddliness. Someone actually accused her of being a cat-hater.

Even puppies aren't safe from trolls.

If puppy posts aren't safe from scrutiny, neither is your brand. If you're on social media or you host a blog, chances are, you've already met a few trolls.

Campbell's sparked a troll frenzy after featuring a real-life gay couple and their toddler son in an ad. A woman named Jessica from the ultra-conservative group "One Million Moms" sparked the feud, posting on Campbell's Facebook page: "I'm so sick of this homosexual agenda, you sell soup… Please take your ad down or you will not have a company anymore!"

Campbell's responded with a statement supporting families of "different configurations, cultures, races and life choices."

Things got really interesting when someone set up a fake Facebook Page "Campbell For Help" to troll the troller. "My word, Jessica. That's quite a leap. While we at Campbell's Kitchen take pride in being empathetic, we are finding it hard to empathize with your vantage point. Would you just prefer we send you some of our classic tomato soup? It's real soup-er?"

Four tactics to tackle trolls.

You can't count on a white knight troll to save your brand from such attacks. So, if you've not already established a plan to manage negative posts, get to it. Your plan should include at least four basic tactics—watch, ignore, engage and employ.

  1. Watch. Take a deep breath and see if any fans come to your defense. There's nothing better than a loyal fan fighting for your honor.

  2. Ignore it. Sometimes the best course of action is to do nothing at all. This is especially true when the troll's comments are especially outlandish. Your followers know the difference between a rant and a true injustice. You're a big brand. You can take a few hits without damaging your reputation. For courage, visit the social media channels of airlines, hospital systems and utility companies. Pacific Gas & Electric didn't engage with the conversation below, however tempting.

  3. Engage with it. When people feel wronged today, they're more likely to post on social media than pick up the phone. If you're in the business of serving customers, your Facebook page is most importantly an extension of your customer service team. Customers expect swift and thoughtful action.

    When your brand is in the wrong, own up to it and use the opportunity to deepen your customer relationships. Kroger gets it. The community managers there are prompt and courteous. The proof is in the posts. Once the team responds, most conversations are wrapped up in a tidy bow. Here's just one of hundreds of recent exchanges:

  4. Learn from it. In addition to vanity metrics—likes, shares, follows—brands should be using social media to manage customer satisfaction and referrals. Your social following is a living, consuming focus group. Use their input to discover flaws and realize opportunities. Find the rainbow at the end of a troll storm. Cue Target.

    When the superstore announced plans to scrub stores of extraneous gender-based signage—boys' toys, girls' bedding, etc.—the trolls marched all over Target's Facebook Page, fuming about political correctness and threatening boycott.

    Target followed up months later with another controversial move, welcoming customers to use the bathroom and fitting room in accordance with their gender identities.The bold move was likely advanced, in part, by the enormous support the retailer received on social after the earlier gender-neutral signage brouhaha. The waters had been tested. They were ready to go full inclusion, knowing full well that it would ignite a vigorous social media debate.

Got a troll nipping at your brand? Use it to the best of your brand's ability. Need help managing your social media channels? These apps are a good start.

5 things Millennials want from healthcare.

America’s largest cohort is no longer a bunch of texting teens. They are adults, adults who are becoming parents and shopping for health insurance. And as Millennials look for healthcare, marketers need to know the best way to reach out to them. These quick facts will help healthcare providers better understand this generation.

  1. Show them how it works

    Millennials value safety more than other generations. They are a more insecure generation, growing up during hard times such as mass shootings and 9/11, according to CEB Iconoculture research. Healthcare providers should be aware of this, and welcome the opportunity to help Millennials through the healthcare process so they feel safe. Many will be buying health insurance for the first time. They will want to know the step-by-step process of purchasing healthcare, along with when to schedule appointments and tips for selecting a physician. Give them an authentic, easy-to-understand approach for this complicated process. Simple, yet relatable ads like Oscar insurance create the intimate feel Millennials are looking for.

    Procrastinators unite! Eventually.

  2. Create online access

    Online database Statista reports that Millennials (age 24-35 in 2017) have the highest internet usage compared to other age groups. Millennials can check flights, book a hotel or order a pizza through a smart phone. Why isn’t it the same with healthcare?

    Text updates on appointment times are common among some healthcare facilities. Henry Ford Health System is known for texting patients 24 hours before their appointment in order to confirm the time. And while many hospitals have the option to book online, not enough are advertising this information to the public. This is the process most Millennials are familiar with. Not only would this option be more convenient, but it would avoid the hassle of being put on hold over the phone.

  3. Post good reviews

    Popular shopping sites like Amazon have ways to access customer reviews, but healthcare is behind the curve. Reviews for healthcare facilities may already exist on some sites like Yelp, but it would be easier for the patient to go right to the source. Customer reviews on facilities and doctors are a way to gain the patient’s trust, and show them what they should expect. It’s also beneficial for you to see what your patients are saying.

  4. Provide details on mental health

    On college campuses in particular, healthcare providers are focusing on helping students manage physical and mental health. When talking to a Millennial about healthcare, it’s best to include topics like stress and anxiety. For university students, mental health is one of the highest growing issues to date. University Health Services are working to increase the amount of mental healthcare specialists on campus, and to create ads that focus on peace of mind. The University of California, Berkley does an excellent job at this. Their destress tweet is a great way to help promote mental wellbeing. The circle grows and shrinks in time to simulate deep breathing, calming down its viewers on #destressmonday.

    #DestressMonday
  5. Cover their children

    Believe it or not, more and more Millennials are becoming parents. Over 45 percent of Millennials are raising children, according to Iconoculture research. When Millennials are shopping for health insurance, healthcare providers should be prepared to insure not just one person, but a family unit. The issue will only become more common over the next few years. According to a 2013 Gallop poll, 87 percent of childless adults between 18-40 plan on having kids someday. In addition to insuring children, doctors should be prepared to walk Millennials through the process of pregnancy, nursing, and caring for their child.

Millennials differ from previous generations, from finding a healthcare provider to managing their personal needs. By personalizing healthcare for each generation, healthcare providers are able to further understand their patients and optimize treatment for every individual.

For more on healthcare marketing trends and insights, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Healthcare Checkup - May 2017

Are you putting your patients first? North Memorial’s recent campaign puts patients’ concerns and experiences at top of mind. Perhaps virtual reality is more your speed? Or are you preparing to respond to your direct competitors? Here’s everything you need to know.

VITAMIN B&P.

This healthcare system treats patients as valued customers. North Memorial is making sure patients are seen and heard.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

How marketers and users can benefit from virtual reality. Virtual Reality (VR) is becoming one of the largest opportunities using sight and sound to create real experiences without actually being present.

When it's smart to take jabs at the competition. A little competition can be a good thing. Especially when brands engage directly with competitors.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

Is your online presence up to snuff? As more digitally savvy Millennials become patients, they expect ease of use and interactivity when it comes to websites. See here.

Boost your online reputation. In the 21st century, you’re nobody unless you’re somebody online.

Serving the Millennial patient. As the millennial generation enters the workforce and becomes increasingly responsible for buying and accessing healthcare, organizations are gearing up for a new “regime.”

MONTHLY DOSE.

Does your hospital marketing budget have you down? Download our free guide, "How to market your hospital on a tight budget," to learn budget efficient marketing strategies.

Weekly Recap - April 21, 2017

Can a social media platform sweat? Snapchat’s about to find out. Rival Instagram has run away with its Stories app, reaching more than 200 million users a day. Adweek is TV gazing, searcing for the hottest genres and the consumer groups that watch them. Did you know 75 percent of TV watchers are no longer in a committed single-screen relationship? Perhaps it’s time to engage in a multimedia campaign. Native, anyone? Take a look.

DETAILS, please

Should Snapchat be worried about Instagram Stories' success? Instagram Stories is now more popular than the app it cloned.

Infographic: Who’s watching TV’s biggest shows and how their interests align with brands. While digital campaigns can be targeted to consumers with uber-specific interests, television advertising, in comparison, can sometimes feel like a shot in the dark.

Need to supplement your social media marketing? Try native advertising. Brands that use it well have experienced record returns on investment.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

This healthcare system treats patients as valued customers. North Memorial is making sure patients are seen and heard.

Burger King, McDonalds and Google: A lesson in multimedia marketing. What happens when two fast food chains involve Google and personal assistants?

When agency work feels more like a mission. Sounds like social marketing. Meet our latest client crush, Reading Works Detroit. We’re helping them tackle adult illiteracy. You can too.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

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  • Brogan & Partners has worked on a wide variety of health issues for us over the years. They have not only consistently provided innovative ideas and award winning campaigns, but they continue to help us work towards our overall goal of improving the health of Michigan residents.  Their creativity, expertise, and enthusiasm makes them an invaluable partner in our... More

  • Hiring Brogan & Partners to help Michigan Women’s Foundation create the brand and messaging around the campaign to raise millions of dollars to solve the backlog of untested rape kits in Detroit was a slam dunk!  With a well-deserved reputation for getting to the heart of complex and highly-charged issues with clear, action-driven communications, the Brogan team... More

  • A well-oiled machine operates at full performance, fluid and unyielding. At Frankenmuth Insurance we have often referred to Brogan & Partners as a well-oiled machine. Our experience with Brogan has been very strong and successful from the start. We view our partners at Brogan as an extension of our own staff. They are readily available to us at any time and deliver... More

  • When launching a startup, resources are very constrained and a startup has to pick its partners very carefully and with deliberation. There were many services that we have had to forego in the early stages of our company, Memloom. One crucial need, however, was identifying and aligning with a strong marketing partner who could help us with our brand, positioning and... More

  • We have been working with the Brogan team for the past 18 months. The Brogan team has truly been our marketing partner. They guided us through development our brand and messaging. They lead our our website redesign and deployment. And they provide excellent counsel on business development and market entry strategies. More

  • From the very first meeting we had with Brogan & Partners, it was clear that they had done their research on PREZIO Health, our competitors and the industry.  It has been  a very positive experience working with the Brogan & Partners team to re-design all of our service and product sheets as well as the total re-design of our website.  Their creativity is top-... More

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