Weekly Recap - September 8, 2017

Got data? Here’s how LinkedIn has become THE place for business-to-business digital marketing. Gens X, Y and Z all agree on this. Check out these stats from Influenster to see how women of all ages feel about branded content. Don’t mess with Texas. Matthew McConaughey uses the classic tagline to bring attention to hurricane relief. Price cuts aren’t always enough. Here’s how brands are attempting to build loyalty and compete with Amazon.

DETAILS, Please

Here’s how LinkedIn changed to become a hot social network. It’s not just somewhere to put your digital resume. Over the last two years, LinkedIn has evolved to become an essential marketing tool for reaching an executive audience.

How and where women prefer interacting with branded content. No surprise here - women of all ages tend to dislike branded content that is political. They prefer authenticity and entertainment.

The Ad Council and Matthew McConaughey join Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. The storm may be over, but the clean-up has only just begun. Here’s how the ad industry made a formal effort to aid hurricane victims.

Amazon cuts Whole Foods prices by as much as 43 percent. On its first day owning the grocery chain, Amazon marked down many items and suggested there’s more to come. To survive, other brands need to create human connection and build loyalty.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

Why longer sales cycles make for happier consumers.  Impulsive buyers may seem like a marketer’s dream. Theirs is more of a buyer’s jaunt than a journey. But as tempting as carpe diem consumers may be, they come with a lot more buyer’s remorse, according to CEB Iconoculture research.

THE Topic of conversation

Authenticity - Authenticity. Discover which brands are getting real and how to market authenticity across genders, generations and ethnic groups. Download our free whitepaper “3 Rules to Creating an Authentic Brand.”

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Why the worst disasters can bring out the best in brands.

Why the worst disasters can bring out the best in brands.
Photo credit: Rick Wilking, Reuters
A man and his dog wade through the Hurricane Harvey floodwaters in Houston.

After Hurricane Katrina swept through New Orleans, Tide’s Loads of Hope program rolled into town with a fleet of trucks filled with Whirlpool washers and dryers. The 2005 disaster left thousands homeless with little more than the clothes on their backs, but Tide provided relief and offered free laundry services for families in need.

Similarly, when residents of Flint, Michigan were unable to drink tap water for fear of lead poisoning, PUR sent scientists, faucet-mounted water purifiers and replacement cartridges to the city. "We are a company that is in a unique position to help because we have a product that does eliminate 99.0 percent of lead, and that's the PUR faucet mount system. And we thought this would be an opportunity to make sure we are able to help people in a way that only we can," said Sharon Robustell of PUR, in a prepared statement.

While southeastern Texas begins its long recovery from the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Harvey, Gallery Furniture is giving shelter to thousands of displaced residents. The Houston-based chain store has transformed two of its locations into temporary housing for victims of the historic tropical storm, offering food, beds and restrooms for anyone in need.

Brands big and small can excel in a crisis, adding depth to consumer relationships that may trump purchase barriers like price and convenience. This is particularly true when the brand cause aligns with the brand promise, product or service.

PetSmart, for example, is giving $1 million to help animal welfare agencies working to rescue, relocate and care for pets that have become homeless due to the storm. The company is also donating supplies and pet food. United Airlines is giving bonus miles to members who donate to disaster relief organizations providing aid to Texas, and FedEx has committed $1 million in cash and transportation support to deliver supplies and medical aid to victims.

Consumers expect more from brands than profitability.

Don’t wait for disaster to strike to find your brand’s corporate responsibility. Being socially responsible comes with the territory. In fact, today’s consumers expect it. 

According to a global study by Havas Worldwide and Market Probe International, 73 percent of consumers believe that brands have a responsibility to do more than just generate profits. Companies that do good may be more successful when it comes to attracting and retaining talent.

In a study by Morning Consult for Fortune Magazine that tested out this theory, nearly two-thirds of the 2,000 respondents (ages 18 to 34) were at least somewhat more likely to work for a company that gave to charity than one that did not. Older generations aren’t quite as corporate-philanthropy-disposed, with 59 percent of those between the ages of 35 and 44, and 47 percent of people between the ages of 45 and 64 reporting values that align with Millennials.

How to find the right cause for your brand. 

There are endless ways your brand can make a difference. But what makes sense for you? CEB Iconoculture suggests the following:

Focus on the cause. Consumers will follow. Patagonia values sustainability. To prove it, they launched a campaign on Black Friday to discourage consumers from buying a popular jacket on the busiest shopping day of the year. The “Don’t Buy This Jacket” campaign encouraged consumers to reconsider consumption and embrace sustainability. The brand proved its sincerity by illustrating its commitment to recycling and environmentally-conscious practices. Patagonia loyalists and wannabes understood.

Do what you can with what you have. Whirlpool is more than just a manufacturer of washers and dryers. The brand gives people confidence that they’re ready for work, school or play. That’s the essence of the Whirlpool Care Counts program. Kids are more likely to skip school when they don’t have clean clothes. So, the brand is helping keep at-risk kids in school by installing washers and dryers in underprivileged schools.

Want another example of a brand that’s discovered an ideal philanthropic match? Check out Consumers Energy Generation Genius.

Weekly Recap - August 18, 2017

The FOMO is real. Your vacation photos on Instagram could be influencing others’ booking decisions. It’s not easy to stand out in someone’s inbox. Use these tips to grab your consumers’ attention. Black is the new black. Black packaging is no longer reserved solely for luxury items. Do you consider your pet to be part of your family? Millennials want customization, convenience, and quality for their fur-babies.

DETAILS, Please

These are the images travelers share most on social media. Olapic’s data highlights what factors motivate travelers to create content on behalf of a brand.

29 e-mail subject lines that increase open and response rates. Not sure what to put in your e-mail subject line? The best subject lines are creative, interest-provoking, and informative.    

Why more packaging should be black, and why it’s so easy to get it wrong. If used carefully, black packaging can help products stand out from the competition.

44 percent of Millennials see their pets as starter children, and that’s a big opportunity for brands. Marketers believe the perception of pets has changed with this generation, and they can capitalize on that animals-as-kids perspective.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

Marketing vasectomies with bros and beer. Vasectomy is more effective, cheaper and safer than female sterilization. That’s why it’s the preferred choice for birth control in many countries like Canada and the U.K. But not the U.S. But marketing may change that.

Sex may be memorable but does it sell? Consumers remember sexy ads, but they’re fuzzy on the details—like product and brand. What does this mean for brands?

THE Topic of conversation

Millennials. Discover who Millennials are, why it’s important to market to them, and how you can increase brand loyalty and engagement. Download our free whitepaper “8 Rules of Marketing to Millennials.”

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Ad Block isn't as scary as you think.

Ad-Block isn't as scary as you think.

Marketers make ads. Ad blocking software blocks ads. There’s a reasonable assumption that we wouldn’t like each other.

Thankfully, there’s hope. While ad blocking is becoming more popular, the facts of the software are often overshadowed by the fear that we’re all doomed. Truth is, it’s manageable and even beneficial for marketers and consumers alike.

It’s not universally popular.

In October 2016, eMarketer posted an article saying that most Millennials have used ad blocking. But in February 2017, the site dialed its estimate back to less than half of Millennials and a quarter of all U.S. internet users. Now eMarketer says 41.1 percent of Millennials are ad blockers. The number drops to 26.9 percent for Gen X, and to 13.9 percent for Boomers. And that’s just via desktop/laptop.

Ad blocking has yet to breach the mobile space. According to eMarketer, less than eight percent of phones use it. This is great news for marketers since Americans spend more time online on their phones vs. a laptop.

Globally speaking, Americans have been slow to adopt ad blocking. According to PageFair, the U.S. ranks ninth out of 21 countries for ad blockers. It remains to be seen whether this is due to indifference or awareness.

Your ads still make break through.

Quite a few popular ad-blocking software brands, AdBlocker Plus and Fair Ad included, only focus on blocking “disruptive ads.” Many sites, as we know, depend on selling ad space for their revenue. Taking that away would be bad for the business. So Adblocker Plus came up with a set of standards that determine if an ad stays or not.

The majority of “disruptive ads” upstage the content. So, as counterintuitive as it may be for your team, try to blend in. More native advertising, less flash.

Your ads still make break through.

Figure 1 Sample of Acceptable Ads from Adblocker Plus

What’s a “disruptive” ad?

  • Blocks content
  • Loads new ads if the primary content does not change
  • Excessive or non-user-initiated hover effects
  • Animated ads
  • Autoplay-sound or video ads
  • Expanding ads
  • Oversized image ads
  • Interstitial page ads
  • Overlay an in-video ads
  • Pre-roll video ads
  • Rich media ads (e.g. Flash ads, Shockwave ads, etc.)

What’s an “acceptable” ad?

  • On the side, top or bottom of content
  • Recognizable as an ad
  • A reasonable size (no bigger than 200-400 px)
  • Without excessive colors
  • Without inappropriate imagery

So that flashy, spinning ad that dances across the screen might not be the best for consumers. But aren’t flashy, spinning ads what consumers want to engage with? Yes and no.

It can be disabled for certain sites.

As a company, you want to create rich content to up engagement. Gen X, Millennials and Gen We all view ads with humor, music, or an interesting story as positive, according to Marketing Land. Yet according to Adblocker Plus, those ads aren’t “acceptable.”

Thankfully, some people turn off ad blocking for certain sites. Out of those who don’t block ads, 20 percent had tried the software on for size in the past. Why’d they stop? A number of sites ask users to turn off ad block in order to access their site. Others are prohibited from seeing content unless ad block is disabled, and a surprising number of users do. Besides wanting to skip ads, a number of internet users fear those ads might be spam or malware. Reassuring them that your site is safe would be a big help for them.

Find the workaround.

Marketers can work around ad blocking software. By following the standards or using mobile ads, we still have the power to reach young and old audiences alike. Follow the rules and focus on substance over sparkle. Build a better user experience.

Stay in the loop with the Brogan Weekly Recap.

Weekly Recap - July 28, 2017

Amazon now has its own social network. Because more channels means more sales. See what we did there with that conjunction? Psychologists say “because” can be a powerful word in marketing. Learn how to wield it well and other tips to get into the minds of consumers.  Experts have different views, but when is the ideal time to post on social? Nestlé shares the secret ingredients to innovating your business from the inside out. Break me off a piece of that Kit Kat bar.

DETAILS, Please

Amazon’s new Spark social feed wants to be ‘Instagram for products.’ New offering from the e-commerce giant is a pragmatic and creative move.

Build more links with these 4 psychology insights. Outreach can be grueling work, and it takes an understanding of how people work in order to find any kind of long-term success by putting it to use.

The best time to post on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Google + [Infographic]. It isn’t enough to just post content to social whenever you feel like it. Some times are better than others.

The 3 ingredients that helped Nestlé infuse innovation into its corporate culture. Nestlé this past weekend celebrated the first anniversary of its global innovation platform Henri@Nestlé, but in truth, it was more of a transmogrification six years in the making.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

Women have money to invest. So, what’s stopping them? When it comes to stocks, mutual funds and life insurance, women are far less likely than men to invest. Some estimates suggest the opportunity presented by female investors is at $5.4 trillion.

5 things your hospital should be doing online. Patients today are relying heavily on the internet for health and wellness needs. Is your hospital prepared? 

THE Topic of conversation

Instagram - Instagram. Learn how your business can use Instagram to build brand awareness and increase engagement. Download our free whitepaper "Why your business should be marketing on Instagram."

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Marketing Statement - Third Quarter 2017

They’re tech natives. They’re constantly connected. They value diversity and social justice. And they can’t balance a checkbook. So, how can financial brands turn Gen We’s weakness into a win-win? And (of course) Millennials, too. Well, these people care less about YOLO, more about adulting. They like reading Money Diaries, a blog about women working small budgets in big cities—because after all, girls just want to have fun with finance. Still, they’re reluctant to stray outside of conservative investments, and the reason may surprise you. Additionally, some estimates suggest the opportunity presented by female investors is at $5.4 trillion. Now we have your attention...

How banks and credit unions can connect with Gen We. A recent report by the Organisation (“s” intended) for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) suggests that many teens aren’t financially literate. The findings, released in May 2017, are from an international student assessment, which tested 15-year-olds in several countries.

How to market to young Millennials. We’ve heard the stereotypes of young Millennials. But is there any truth to them? This generation isn’t all YOLO, all the time. They’re not frivolous or irresponsible in their attempt to live for the moment. And when it comes to adulthood, they’re definitely not delayed.

Money Diaries is the Millennial woman's Bridget Jones. I wonder what’s in her wallet? That’s the gist of “Money Diaries” at Refinery29, a New York-based website that publishes the daily personal financial decisions of Millennial women.

Women have money to invest. So, what’s stopping them? When it comes to banking, women are just as likely as men to have the basics—checking, savings, mortgage, retirement plans. But when it comes to stocks, mutual funds and life insurance, women are far less likely than men to invest.

QUICK study

From insights to innovation: Applying creativity to connect the dots. The 2017 Iconosphere gave us lots to think about. Our creative director captures five key takeaways.

The 3 Pillars of a Successful Onboarding Strategy in Banking. The key to moving the needle is your ability to understand why someone decided to start doing business with you — and continues (or doesn’t continue) to do business with you.

How to find a rainbow at the end of a troll storm. Blame it on the anonymity of the internet or the juiced up political environment. Whatever the prompt, trolls are inescapable. Arm your brand with these tactics to manage a troll attack.

How Quicken Loans' New CMO Moved from Fiat to Home Finance. Mortgage marketing can be tricky— Quicken Loans learned that last year when the Detroit company was hit with social backlash for over-simplifying the loan process in its first Super Bowl ad, earning comparisons to the subprime lending crisis of 2008.

Here are 4 keys to ranking for multiple keywords. In today’s SEO, where context is more important than keywords, performance measurement often still comes down to specific keyword terms and phrases that a user searches

SHARPEN the saw

You can depend on social media to change. Often. What’s an industrious, but insanely taxed, marketer to do? Read our free whitepaper on the nine social media trends impacting your online performance, for starters. It’s a quick read, but it’s rich with key insights to evolve your social strategies for optimum brand engagement. Download now.

START a conversation

Share the Marketing Statement. Tell two friends. And so on.

Weekly Recap - July 21, 2017

Amazon has officially started a supermarket war. With its recent purchase of Whole Foods, the online behemoth and Walmart are on a mission to take over the grocery industry—brick and mortar and online. Does your brand have a proper mission? Promote it in video to build loyalty. Your brand too can be a YouTube star with these pointers. Maybe even connect with Gen-Z.

DETAILS, Please

Amazon to buy Whole Foods for $13.4 billion. A deal that will instantly transform the company that pioneered online shopping into a merchant with physical outposts in hundreds of neighborhoods across the country.

12 truly inspiring company vision and mission statement examples. Often, the reason we stay loyal to brands is because of their values. The best brands strive to combine physical, emotional, and logical elements into one exceptional customer- and employee- experience.

7 vital elements of a successful YouTube video. YouTube is a marketer’s paradise. The statistics are mind blowing.

Move over Millennials, Gen-Z is now the largest single population segment. According to Nielsen’s new Total Audience report, Millennials and Gen-Z now comprise 48 percent of the total media audience.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

5 stats about marketing to Baby Boomers. With a median household income of $40,581, Millennials earn 20 percent less than their Boomer parents did at the same age.

How banks and credit unions can connect to Gen We.  Just because a kid has a bank account, it doesn’t mean she knows how to manage it.

THE Topic of conversation

Communicating with Visuals - Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

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How banks and credit unions can connect with Gen We.

How banks and credit unions can connect with Gen We

Just because a kid has a bank account, it doesn’t mean she knows how to manage it.

A recent report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) suggests that many teens aren’t financially literate. The findings, released in May 2017, are from an international student assessment which tested 15-year-olds in several countries.

On the assessment, 22 percent of teens scored below the financial-literacy "baseline level," and only 12 percent scored at the highest level, according to a story published at Bloomberg.com.  The mean financial-literacy score for U.S. teens was very close to the OECD average. The U.S. ranked seventh among the 15 participating countries and economies.

The assessment covered various financial skills, from reading invoices and recognizing a bank phishing email to deciphering a pay slip and reading stock prices recorded over time. While 56 percent of the teens studied reported having a bank account, nearly two out of three of those teens didn't have the skills to manage their account.

The dismal results spell opportunity for financial services. Give a kid a bank account, and she’ll have a safe place to keep her birthday money. Teach her to save and invest and she may reward you with a lifetime of business.

Credit unions have long sponsored personal finance programs for youth.  They lean on proven curriculum from Junior Achievement and National Endowment for Financial Services curriculum to familiarize kids with the credit, savings, budgeting and investments. Some even have student-run branches to teach bank management in addition to promoting thrift. 

And the courses work: high school seniors who take personal finance are more likely to save money, and have a budget and invest, according to a Discover survey.

Three ways for financial brands to connect with Gen We:

Get involved in the schools.

Your future customers are in high school. Help prepare them for the world—and your products and services—by volunteering in the classroom. Financial literacy is the ultimate brand fit. In addition to NEFE and Junior Achievement. Jump$tart Financial Smarts for Students has aggregated an online library rich with vetted personal finance classroom materials.

Seize teachable moments.

Many banks and credit unions have programs aimed at elementary-age children. The promotional items come quarterly, courtesy of a cutesy mascot and an opportunity to win tickets to an amusement park. While this tactic may have worked a couple decades ago, it falls flat on today’s tech-savvy generation. What’s more, these programs tend to fizzle out after third-grade.

Instead, shift your promotional budget to high school. This is the age when kids are becoming much more aware of money. They want stuff and want to do stuff—much of which comes with a price. Help them become good consumers by seizing any opportunity to counsel them. Yes, invite them to sign up for a checking account, and help them understand lending when they apply for a car loan or college loan. Credit is another teachable moment. While one-on-one conversations are far more personal, you can host youth seminars to reach a wider audience more efficiently.

Create Gen We-friendly products.

Gen We is growing up to be particularly entrepreneurial. They’re also more influential than previous generations on the family budget, according to CEB Iconoculture research. Rather than attempt to squeeze them into existing financial products and services, build a suite around them and market accordingly. Provide rewards and incentives for first-time borrowers and positive credit behaviors.

For more on marketing to Gen We, check out 5 things you need to know about Gen We.

5 stats about marketing to Baby Boomers.

5 stats about marketing to Baby Boomers.

Remember Baby Boomers? The behemoth cohort, and their spending power, is being ignored while marketers obsess over Millennials. With a median household income of $40,581, Millennials earn 20 percent less than their Boomer parents did at the same age. Here are five eye-opening stats worth knowing about marketing to Baby Boomers:

  1. Baby Boomers spend more time online than Millennials. Believe it or not, 51 percent of Baby Boomers spend 15 hours per week online, while only 41 percent of Millennials spend the same amount of time online. (The State of the User Experience)
  2. Baby Boomers outspend younger adults online 2:1 on a per-capita basis. They also spend more than other generations by an estimated $400 billion a year. (Forrester)
  3. According to Nielsen research, Baby Boomers watch 174 hours of TV a month, 63 percent more than Millennials. This probably comes as a result of Millennials spending more time scrolling through social media than watching television, but 82 percent of Baby Boomers also belong to at least one social networking site.
  4. 49 percent of Baby Boomer tablet users and 40 percent of smartphone users made a purchase after conducting searches on their devices. (eMarketer)
  5. Baby Boomers spend the most across all product categories, but are targeted by just 5-10 percent of marketing. Baby Boomers also control 70 percent of disposable income in the U.S. (Venture Capital Review)

For more on marketing to Boomers, check out this blog.

Blog Category: 

Weekly Recap - July 14, 2017

The more you know, the more likely you are to buy. Discover the role of education in purchase decisions. What’s the average attention span of consumers? When it comes to email, it’s longer than you might expect. Amazon Prime Day came and went, but the showdown between Google home and Amazon Echo continues. (Cue ominous music.) Finally, should your brand look into virtual reality?

DETAILS, Please

How content marketing impacts purchase decisions, brand affinity, and trust. New research from Conductor illustrates the impact of education on purchase decisions and brand affinity.

The short attention span solution for marketers (Hint: it’s email) [infographic]. According to Entrepreneur, 2017 marks email’s 40th birthday, with 1978 cited as the year when the first marketing email was delivered.           

Prime Day brings a price battle between Amazon Echo and Google Home. Both companies drop the prices on their smart speakers, but Amazon’s aggressive discount could win the day.

Is video a game changer for virtual reality? Adoption of virtual reality (VR) headsets hasn’t grown by leaps and bounds.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

Write better meta descriptions and improve CTR [with cute animals]. Personally, I dread writing meta descriptions. I really do. So to make the process easier, I included several priceless animals for your viewing pleasure. You’re welcome.

Gen Z: marketing solutions for the next largest generation [data]. In three years, Generation Z (those born after 1996), will account for one-third of the US population. While the general public might be tempted to lump them in with Millennials, Gen Z has its own set of unique values.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

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Gen Z: Marketing solutions for the next largest generation [data].

Gen Z: Marketing solutions for the next largest generation [data].

In three years, Generation Z (also known as Gen We), or those born after 1996 will account for one-third of the U.S. population. While the general public might be tempted to lump them in with Millennials, Gen Z has their own set of unique values.

Who is Gen Z?

A major defining feature of Gen Z is they do not remember 9/11. They were raised under the shadow of increased national security and perceived danger from outside forces. As such, they are more cautious than previous generations, with a 40 percent drop in teen births and additional drops in high school drop-outs and alcohol abuse. With the oldest turning 21 and entering college and the workforce, now is the time to look at their habits in order to better understand this generation.

Ad avoiders.

Most of Gen Z won’t sit through a 30 second ad. Their perspective on certain ads is almost twice as negative as Millennials. We now live in a world of multiple screens. As soon as a commercial interrupts their program Gen Z will turn to their phone or laptop. This generation bounces between five screens: TV, laptop, desktop, tablet, and smartphone. They are also more likely to install ad blockers on their laptop.

Solution: Dazzle them. The same research on Gen Z’s ad perspective found that over 55 percent of Gen Z enjoyed ads that told an interesting story or had good music, and 72 percent enjoyed ads with humor. What’s more, don’t make your ads non-skippable. This will only create backlash from the audience.

How would you describe your attitude toward each of the following formats of online video advertising?

Figure 1 credit: Marketing Land

Collection of culture.

Gen Z is set to be the most diverse generation. Roughly 45 percent of the demographic identifies with a minority, with particular growth in Hispanic and multicultural families. A study from 2016 showed over 60 percent of Gen Z enjoyed ads with diversity.

Solution: When trying to show diversity, talk to your demographic. Testing campaigns with a focus group or marketing research will help ensure your ad connects at the right level.

Attitudes toward people/diversity in ads according to US internet users, by generation, Sep 2016

Wallet weary.

A survey conducted by Lincoln Financial Group found that among Gen Z members ages 15-19, 60 percent have a saving account, and 13 was the average age the cohort began financial planning for the future. One-fifth believes debt should be avoided at all costs. Growing up through the Great Recession, Gen Z is naturally nervous about finances.

Solution: Emphasize your deals. While humor and entertainment will draw your customers in, a deal is what will sell them. Groupon is a great way to draw in saving savvy customers. You should also make sure customers can pay through their phone, like roughly half of Gen Z does.

Gen Z is learning from millennials' money mistakes.

Figure 2 Credit: Center for Generational Kinetics

Brand busters.

Growing up along the Occupy Wall Street Movement has made Gen Z concerned about big institutions and corporate greed. Retail stores such as Abercrombie & Finch have been doing poorly with the thrift store generation, since Gen Z cares more about the quality of the product than the brand that produces them. The internet allows access to countless brands, most with consumer reviews so these young consumers can find the best deal. Overall, 90 percent of customers read a review before going to a business.

Solution: People Promoters. While Gen Z may not trust brands, they do trust people. Not exactly celebrities, but real people who have gained a following on Twitter and other social media. Copious YouTubers big and small, like Domics, are known for having sponsored content at the end of their videos. They don’t have to be an all-star, anyone within your niche market should help get your game on.

TV turn-off.

Growing up online has made Gen Z aware of their options. The average amount of time 18-24 year olds watch TV has fallen by 10 hours since 2011, according to Visual Capitalist. For Gen Z, it’s all about YouTube and Netflix now. And you can bet that they’re on these sites via smartphone, whereas Millennials are more known for using their laptop.

Solution: Go online. Use online ads and social media. Know types of Facebook ads and ways to interact online. The dating app Bumble excels at online interaction by consistently responding to comments and always offering to chat.

Know your generations. Check out how to market to young Millennials or 5 things Millennials want from healthcare.

Healthcare Checkup - July 2017

From moms venting on social media to a new ad campaign from The Coalition to Protect America’s Healthcare, we’re seeing lots of messaging about the ACHA. As if those young Millennials don’t have enough to worry about! Check out how to communicate with them as well as through videos, voice activated search, and patient education.

VITAMIN B&P.

Moms use social media to talk health coverage. Seen hashtags like #IAmAPreexisting Condition and #CSection lately? See why some frustration-venting moms are freaking out over proposed ACHA reform and how your brand might help them.

Healthcare marketing: Making privacy a priority for patients. While we love to share steps walked and medical triumphs, we want absolute control over our personal health data. What should your healthcare brand do to reassure that privacy is an absolute?

5 tips to boost video performance. Yes, video is hot, but only well-done video. Check out how you can make your healthcare videos outshine and out-click your competition.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

How to market to young Millennials.  It’s not all YOLO for the young Millennial, as this chronically stressed cohort worries about money, employment, even retirement.  Acknowledging and empathizing with their struggles can benefit your brand.

What you need to know about voice activated search and SEO. 50 percent of all searches will be voice activated by 2020. Is your brand ready?

INDUSTRY PULSE.

The Coalition to Protect America’s HealthCare just launched an ad campaign asking senators to protect the estimated 23 million Americans who could lose coverage under the AHCA. Running in 12 key states, the new TV spot queries, “Am I one of the 23 million? Is my family? My best friend?”

How hospitals use data for patient education. Speaking of personal health data, here’s an infographic that illustrates how to maximize data retrieval via pertinent patient education to boost outcomes.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Looking to market to all generations but don’t have the budget? Not a problem. There’s one common denominator across each audience. Can you guess what it is? Download our free guide: How to market healthcare to all generations, to learn more.

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  • When launching a startup, resources are very constrained and a startup has to pick its partners very carefully and with deliberation. There were many services that we have had to forego in the early stages of our company, Memloom. One crucial need, however, was identifying and aligning with a strong marketing partner who could help us with our brand, positioning and... More

  • We have been working with the Brogan team for the past 18 months. The Brogan team has truly been our marketing partner. They guided us through development our brand and messaging. They lead our our website redesign and deployment. And they provide excellent counsel on business development and market entry strategies. More

  • From the very first meeting we had with Brogan & Partners, it was clear that they had done their research on PREZIO Health, our competitors and the industry.  It has been  a very positive experience working with the Brogan & Partners team to re-design all of our service and product sheets as well as the total re-design of our website.  Their creativity is top-... More

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