Weekly Recap - July 21, 2017

Amazon has officially started a supermarket war. With its recent purchase of Whole Foods, the online behemoth and Walmart are on a mission to take over the grocery industry—brick and mortar and online. Does your brand have a proper mission? Promote it in video to build loyalty. Your brand too can be a YouTube star with these pointers. Maybe even connect with Gen-Z.

DETAILS, Please

Amazon to buy Whole Foods for $13.4 billion. A deal that will instantly transform the company that pioneered online shopping into a merchant with physical outposts in hundreds of neighborhoods across the country.

12 truly inspiring company vision and mission statement examples. Often, the reason we stay loyal to brands is because of their values. The best brands strive to combine physical, emotional, and logical elements into one exceptional customer- and employee- experience.

7 vital elements of a successful YouTube video. YouTube is a marketer’s paradise. The statistics are mind blowing.

Move over Millennials, Gen-Z is now the largest single population segment. According to Nielsen’s new Total Audience report, Millennials and Gen-Z now comprise 48 percent of the total media audience.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

5 stats about marketing to Baby Boomers. With a median household income of $40,581, Millennials earn 20 percent less than their Boomer parents did at the same age.

How banks and credit unions can connect to Gen We.  Just because a kid has a bank account, it doesn’t mean she knows how to manage it.

THE Topic of conversation

Communicating with Visuals - Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

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How banks and credit unions can connect with Gen We.

How banks and credit unions can connect with Gen We

Just because a kid has a bank account, it doesn’t mean she knows how to manage it.

A recent report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) suggests that many teens aren’t financially literate. The findings, released in May 2017, are from an international student assessment which tested 15-year-olds in several countries.

On the assessment, 22 percent of teens scored below the financial-literacy "baseline level," and only 12 percent scored at the highest level, according to a story published at Bloomberg.com.  The mean financial-literacy score for U.S. teens was very close to the OECD average. The U.S. ranked seventh among the 15 participating countries and economies.

The assessment covered various financial skills, from reading invoices and recognizing a bank phishing email to deciphering a pay slip and reading stock prices recorded over time. While 56 percent of the teens studied reported having a bank account, nearly two out of three of those teens didn't have the skills to manage their account.

The dismal results spell opportunity for financial services. Give a kid a bank account, and she’ll have a safe place to keep her birthday money. Teach her to save and invest and she may reward you with a lifetime of business.

Credit unions have long sponsored personal finance programs for youth.  They lean on proven curriculum from Junior Achievement and National Endowment for Financial Services curriculum to familiarize kids with the credit, savings, budgeting and investments. Some even have student-run branches to teach bank management in addition to promoting thrift. 

And the courses work: high school seniors who take personal finance are more likely to save money, and have a budget and invest, according to a Discover survey.

Three ways for financial brands to connect with Gen We:

Get involved in the schools.

Your future customers are in high school. Help prepare them for the world—and your products and services—by volunteering in the classroom. Financial literacy is the ultimate brand fit. In addition to NEFE and Junior Achievement. Jump$tart Financial Smarts for Students has aggregated an online library rich with vetted personal finance classroom materials.

Seize teachable moments.

Many banks and credit unions have programs aimed at elementary-age children. The promotional items come quarterly, courtesy of a cutesy mascot and an opportunity to win tickets to an amusement park. While this tactic may have worked a couple decades ago, it falls flat on today’s tech-savvy generation. What’s more, these programs tend to fizzle out after third-grade.

Instead, shift your promotional budget to high school. This is the age when kids are becoming much more aware of money. They want stuff and want to do stuff—much of which comes with a price. Help them become good consumers by seizing any opportunity to counsel them. Yes, invite them to sign up for a checking account, and help them understand lending when they apply for a car loan or college loan. Credit is another teachable moment. While one-on-one conversations are far more personal, you can host youth seminars to reach a wider audience more efficiently.

Create Gen We-friendly products.

Gen We is growing up to be particularly entrepreneurial. They’re also more influential than previous generations on the family budget, according to CEB Iconoculture research. Rather than attempt to squeeze them into existing financial products and services, build a suite around them and market accordingly. Provide rewards and incentives for first-time borrowers and positive credit behaviors.

For more on marketing to Gen We, check out 5 things you need to know about Gen We.

5 stats about marketing to Baby Boomers.

5 stats about marketing to Baby Boomers.

Remember Baby Boomers? The behemoth cohort, and their spending power, is being ignored while marketers obsess over Millennials. With a median household income of $40,581, Millennials earn 20 percent less than their Boomer parents did at the same age. Here are five eye-opening stats worth knowing about marketing to Baby Boomers:

  1. Baby Boomers spend more time online than Millennials. Believe it or not, 51 percent of Baby Boomers spend 15 hours per week online, while only 41 percent of Millennials spend the same amount of time online. (The State of the User Experience)
  2. Baby Boomers outspend younger adults online 2:1 on a per-capita basis. They also spend more than other generations by an estimated $400 billion a year. (Forrester)
  3. According to Nielsen research, Baby Boomers watch 174 hours of TV a month, 63 percent more than Millennials. This probably comes as a result of Millennials spending more time scrolling through social media than watching television, but 82 percent of Baby Boomers also belong to at least one social networking site.
  4. 49 percent of Baby Boomer tablet users and 40 percent of smartphone users made a purchase after conducting searches on their devices. (eMarketer)
  5. Baby Boomers spend the most across all product categories, but are targeted by just 5-10 percent of marketing. Baby Boomers also control 70 percent of disposable income in the U.S. (Venture Capital Review)

For more on marketing to Boomers, check out this blog.

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Weekly Recap - July 14, 2017

The more you know, the more likely you are to buy. Discover the role of education in purchase decisions. What’s the average attention span of consumers? When it comes to email, it’s longer than you might expect. Amazon Prime Day came and went, but the showdown between Google home and Amazon Echo continues. (Cue ominous music.) Finally, should your brand look into virtual reality?

DETAILS, Please

How content marketing impacts purchase decisions, brand affinity, and trust. New research from Conductor illustrates the impact of education on purchase decisions and brand affinity.

The short attention span solution for marketers (Hint: it’s email) [infographic]. According to Entrepreneur, 2017 marks email’s 40th birthday, with 1978 cited as the year when the first marketing email was delivered.           

Prime Day brings a price battle between Amazon Echo and Google Home. Both companies drop the prices on their smart speakers, but Amazon’s aggressive discount could win the day.

Is video a game changer for virtual reality? Adoption of virtual reality (VR) headsets hasn’t grown by leaps and bounds.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

Write better meta descriptions and improve CTR [with cute animals]. Personally, I dread writing meta descriptions. I really do. So to make the process easier, I included several priceless animals for your viewing pleasure. You’re welcome.

Gen Z: marketing solutions for the next largest generation [data]. In three years, Generation Z (those born after 1996), will account for one-third of the US population. While the general public might be tempted to lump them in with Millennials, Gen Z has its own set of unique values.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

Gen Z: Marketing solutions for the next largest generation [data].

Gen Z: Marketing solutions for the next largest generation [data].

In three years, Generation Z (also known as Gen We), or those born after 1996 will account for one-third of the U.S. population. While the general public might be tempted to lump them in with Millennials, Gen Z has their own set of unique values.

Who is Gen Z?

A major defining feature of Gen Z is they do not remember 9/11. They were raised under the shadow of increased national security and perceived danger from outside forces. As such, they are more cautious than previous generations, with a 40 percent drop in teen births and additional drops in high school drop-outs and alcohol abuse. With the oldest turning 21 and entering college and the workforce, now is the time to look at their habits in order to better understand this generation.

Ad avoiders.

Most of Gen Z won’t sit through a 30 second ad. Their perspective on certain ads is almost twice as negative as Millennials. We now live in a world of multiple screens. As soon as a commercial interrupts their program Gen Z will turn to their phone or laptop. This generation bounces between five screens: TV, laptop, desktop, tablet, and smartphone. They are also more likely to install ad blockers on their laptop.

Solution: Dazzle them. The same research on Gen Z’s ad perspective found that over 55 percent of Gen Z enjoyed ads that told an interesting story or had good music, and 72 percent enjoyed ads with humor. What’s more, don’t make your ads non-skippable. This will only create backlash from the audience.

How would you describe your attitude toward each of the following formats of online video advertising?

Figure 1 credit: Marketing Land

Collection of culture.

Gen Z is set to be the most diverse generation. Roughly 45 percent of the demographic identifies with a minority, with particular growth in Hispanic and multicultural families. A study from 2016 showed over 60 percent of Gen Z enjoyed ads with diversity.

Solution: When trying to show diversity, talk to your demographic. Testing campaigns with a focus group or marketing research will help ensure your ad connects at the right level.

Attitudes toward people/diversity in ads according to US internet users, by generation, Sep 2016

Wallet weary.

A survey conducted by Lincoln Financial Group found that among Gen Z members ages 15-19, 60 percent have a saving account, and 13 was the average age the cohort began financial planning for the future. One-fifth believes debt should be avoided at all costs. Growing up through the Great Recession, Gen Z is naturally nervous about finances.

Solution: Emphasize your deals. While humor and entertainment will draw your customers in, a deal is what will sell them. Groupon is a great way to draw in saving savvy customers. You should also make sure customers can pay through their phone, like roughly half of Gen Z does.

Gen Z is learning from millennials' money mistakes.

Figure 2 Credit: Center for Generational Kinetics

Brand busters.

Growing up along the Occupy Wall Street Movement has made Gen Z concerned about big institutions and corporate greed. Retail stores such as Abercrombie & Finch have been doing poorly with the thrift store generation, since Gen Z cares more about the quality of the product than the brand that produces them. The internet allows access to countless brands, most with consumer reviews so these young consumers can find the best deal. Overall, 90 percent of customers read a review before going to a business.

Solution: People Promoters. While Gen Z may not trust brands, they do trust people. Not exactly celebrities, but real people who have gained a following on Twitter and other social media. Copious YouTubers big and small, like Domics, are known for having sponsored content at the end of their videos. They don’t have to be an all-star, anyone within your niche market should help get your game on.

TV turn-off.

Growing up online has made Gen Z aware of their options. The average amount of time 18-24 year olds watch TV has fallen by 10 hours since 2011, according to Visual Capitalist. For Gen Z, it’s all about YouTube and Netflix now. And you can bet that they’re on these sites via smartphone, whereas Millennials are more known for using their laptop.

Solution: Go online. Use online ads and social media. Know types of Facebook ads and ways to interact online. The dating app Bumble excels at online interaction by consistently responding to comments and always offering to chat.

Know your generations. Check out how to market to young Millennials or 5 things Millennials want from healthcare.

Healthcare Checkup - July 2017

From moms venting on social media to a new ad campaign from The Coalition to Protect America’s Healthcare, we’re seeing lots of messaging about the ACHA. As if those young Millennials don’t have enough to worry about! Check out how to communicate with them as well as through videos, voice activated search, and patient education.

VITAMIN B&P.

Moms use social media to talk health coverage. Seen hashtags like #IAmAPreexisting Condition and #CSection lately? See why some frustration-venting moms are freaking out over proposed ACHA reform and how your brand might help them.

Healthcare marketing: Making privacy a priority for patients. While we love to share steps walked and medical triumphs, we want absolute control over our personal health data. What should your healthcare brand do to reassure that privacy is an absolute?

5 tips to boost video performance. Yes, video is hot, but only well-done video. Check out how you can make your healthcare videos outshine and out-click your competition.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

How to market to young Millennials.  It’s not all YOLO for the young Millennial, as this chronically stressed cohort worries about money, employment, even retirement.  Acknowledging and empathizing with their struggles can benefit your brand.

What you need to know about voice activated search and SEO. 50 percent of all searches will be voice activated by 2020. Is your brand ready?

INDUSTRY PULSE.

The Coalition to Protect America’s HealthCare just launched an ad campaign asking senators to protect the estimated 23 million Americans who could lose coverage under the AHCA. Running in 12 key states, the new TV spot queries, “Am I one of the 23 million? Is my family? My best friend?”

How hospitals use data for patient education. Speaking of personal health data, here’s an infographic that illustrates how to maximize data retrieval via pertinent patient education to boost outcomes.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Looking to market to all generations but don’t have the budget? Not a problem. There’s one common denominator across each audience. Can you guess what it is? Download our free guide: How to market healthcare to all generations, to learn more.

Weekly Recap - June 30, 2017

Do your statistics have photos? They should, if you want more views. Facebook. When it comes to ads, you could probably give yourself a boost. Or go all out and spend $100 thousand on your ads, it’s possible. Will Millennials shop more than their parents? Know how the cohort is shaking up the market.

DETAILS, Please

Visual content receives 94 percent more views than text-only marketing. Strong visual content is key to finding success in today’s communications landscape, whether it’s social media, email marketing or content creation.

7 Facebook ads tips boost your ecommerce sales. Want to increase sales? Of course you do. Facebook advertising represents an awesome opportunity to do just that.

What we learned from spending $100k on Facebook ads. When they were suddenly given $100k to spend on Facebook ads, they were positively giddy. And unbelievably nervous.

How Millennials will reshape the luxury market. By 2025, Bain projects that Millennials and Gen Z will account for 45 percent of the global personal luxury goods market.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

Moms use social media to talk health coverage. Moms are to Facebook what tweens are to Instagram. It’s where she finds advice, attention and, most importantly, an audience.

7 ways you can write better blog titles. If you don’t like spending hours to think of a four-word title, you’re not alone. Creating a good title is work.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

Moms use social media to talk health coverage.

Moms are to Facebook what tweens are to Instagram. It’s where she finds advice, attention and, most importantly, an audience. Torn between two brands? Post it. Kid matriculated to middle school? Share it. Fear of losing coverage for your child’s pre-existing medical condition? Promote it.

According to Nielsen research, Generation X (ages 40-52 in 2017) spends the most time on social media: almost seven hours a week versus Millennials, who come in second, with just over six hours a week. Facebook is mom’s channel of choice, with 81 percent using the platform versus 66 percent of dads. Parents, especially moms, interact with their networks frequently. About 94 percent post or comment Facebook regularly.

What’s she posting? Healthcare is always a hot topic with mom on social. She asks about the shelf life of sunscreen, chronicles her 2 a.m. dash to the ER with her wheezing toddler, and invites debate over the best treatments for poison ivy and bug bites. Changes in health—whether positive or negative—are particularly post worthy.

Like the risk of losing healthcare coverage. The fate of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has moms taking to their worries to social media with hashtags like #IAmAPreexistingCondition and #Csection to vent frustration over losing coverage or higher premiums because they have given birth. Under the American Health Care Act (AHCA)—legislation proposed to replace the ACA—C-sections would be categorized as a pre-existing condition, along with diabetes and congenital heart problems.

Moms are also worried about losing coverage for their families. Some share photos of their children who could die without insurance. Others share their family’s health struggles and openly fret about the impact of policy change.

The ACA/ACHA conversation will continue for months if not years while legislation is considered in Congress. Meanwhile, healthcare will be always be a social media fave. So, what’s a health care provider to do? Participate in the conversation or sit on the sidelines? You may opt to toggle between the two, just don’t ignore mom altogether. She is the undisputed healthcare decision maker in the family. You need her on your side and that means acknowledging her social media activity.

Participate in the conversation.

The topic du jour is the ACA. If you’re a health care provider, chances are your physicians and nurses are already entertaining questions from patients about the ACA. Will I be covered? Will I have to pay more? Your role is to be informative without being political. It may be a tough line to walk, but if you’re not careful you’ll alienate some patients.

Develop a social media plan to keep your team on track. Stick to the hard facts and avoid rumor and innuendo. Your job is to interpret the current policy, not analyze what the impact of proposed legislation. Provide helpful tips and insights into how to use insurance benefits to their full advantage. If and when new legislation is adopted, articulate what if any impact they may experience. Be a guide, a trusted resource that mom can lean on.

Sit on the sidelines.

Just because you can’t contribute to the politics of the day doesn’t mean you should ignore it altogether. Your social media team should monitor the healthcare conversation regularly, providing insights into how consumers are reacting. Think of it as a dynamic, diverse focus group. When people complain of stress, consider content to help families cope in positive ways (yoga, meditation, long walks, etc.). If you work directly with patients, this knowledge will help your team communicate more authentically with them.

In short, mom is freaking out about healthcare coverage right now. She’s commiserating with millions of her compatriots very publicly via her favorite social media channel, Facebook.  If you want to build trust and loyalty with mom, pay attention to what’s keeping her up at night and posting at all hours of the day.

Weekly Recap - June 16, 2017

Words matter. But so does tone. When it comes to conversions, which is more important? The answer is in your prospects. Know your audience and the path they take to your door. Need a map? You’re in the majority. A paltry 4 percent of brands surveyed feel confident they get truly their base. Chances are you’ll find many of them scrolling through social feeds, happily consuming sponsored content. If you’re following the dramatic changes in organic search, follow the leader.

DETAILS, Please

Copywriting for conversations: 9 ways emotion and word count affect your landing pages [new data]. Should your tone be positive? Angry? There’s new data for each industry. 

How to solve the mystery of what customers really want. How well do you really know your customers? If your company is like most brands, you already realize that you don’t really know them at all.

Sponsored spenders: one in three Millennials have made a purchase based on branded content. A recent Collective Bias study finds consumers coming around to idea of promoted posts.

How Google’s algorithms do & will work together. In a recent Webmaster Central Google Hangout John Mueller revealed that Google’s various algorithms share data.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

How to market to young Millennials. We’ve heard the stereotypes of young Millennials. But is there any truth to them?

THE Topic of conversation

Millennials - discover who Millennials are, why it’s important to market to them, and how you can increase brand loyalty and engagement. Download our free whitepaper “8 Rules of Marketing to Millennials.”

SHARING is CARING

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How to market to young Millennials.

We’ve heard the stereotypes of young Millennials. But is there any truth to them?

According to CEB Iconoculture, this generation isn’t all YOLO, all the time. They’re not frivolous or irresponsible in their attempt to live for the moment. And when it comes to adulthood, they’re definitely not delayed.

In fact, values around the idea of letting loose, like freedom and fun, have actually lost ground with this group. Meanwhile, values like learning, responsibility and purpose have gained traction.

Who are young Millennials?

This generation is classified as people between the ages of 20 to 28.

What’s on their mind?

Believe it or not, young Millennials are thinking more about their money than the rest of the U.S. population. They’re determined to be thoughtful and strategic with their salaries, which is likely a need that stems from their overall anxieties.

Professional issues (everything from employment to retirement) keep this chronically-stressed cohort awake at night. Pressures like debt and instability caused 72 percent of them to say they’re always concerned about having enough money. And today, three quarters of this population say they would rather save it than spend it. But it’s not just talk… they’re putting thoughts into action. One in five are putting more than half of their income directly into savings.

What’s their mood?

Compared to older generations, a greater number of younger Millennials are dealing with negative moods in their daily decision-making. Of course, economic hardship and the fight for a stable future affect all consumers, but according to CEB Iconoculture, this group is the most worried. In fact, close to one third of this generation regularly experiences feelings of nervousness, guilt and fear.

How can brands connect?

When a brand can recognize who a young Millennial really is, and then support them in their unique life stage, they’ll win. Content that’s realistic and aspirational, rather than condescending, will always be more well received.

Try these three tips to market to young Millennials:

  1. Acknowledge they are growing up.

    This group coined the term “adulting.” And they’re proud of it. Whenever possible, your brand’s messaging should reward it. Consider Heineken’s “Moderate Drinkers Wanted.” It puts a spotlight on young adults who don’t overdo it.

     

  2. Empathize through non-judgmental humor.

    Life is tough, especially when you’re young. Putting your brand in a position to empathize with their reality can provide an emotional refuge. Translation? Laugh with them, not at them. For example, the American Express campaign, “Everyday Congrats,” pokes fun at overcoming real-life challenges, while still being respectful of the growing-up process.  

     

  3. Develop products and services that encourage and assist.

    The best way to show you understand this audience? Try creating something that makes this chapter of their life easier. Apps or websites that can help people live a more productive life will make you a more favorable brand. Streaks, for example, branded their app as “the to-do list that helps you form good habits.” It’s gained popularity, thanks to the encouragement it offers.

    Choose up to six tasks you want to turn into daily habits.

Want more information about marketing to Millennials? Subscribe to our Brogan Weekly Recap.

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Healthcare Checkup - June 2017

How can healthcare providers tap into the safety Millennials so crave? Should you be focusing your mental health campaign at university populations? Or should you stick with the SAD month of January? No worries, as you’ll be happy to see all the ways brands are empowering women.

VITAMIN B&P.

5 things Millennials want from healthcare. No longer a bunch of texting teens, America’s largest cohort is having babies and purchasing healthcare. Take a look at what they’re looking for.

A healthcare marketer’s cheat sheet: what to advertise and when. We all know about flu season and heart month, but what about some other opportune months to market your clinical services?

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

6 top takeaways from Iconosphere 2017. From “play deficit disorder” to a world without smart phones, see what’s up and coming in future-forward ideas and consumer insights shared at this conference.

6 ways brands are empowering women in 2017. Kudos to Microsoft for encouraging young girls to stay in STEM and MCann New York for the statue of the darling girl facing off the infamous Wall Street Charging Bull.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

Have you added influencer marketing to your mix yet? Think maternity care, fitness and bariatrics. And how are your docs feeling about their workplace these days? Have you given them a forum to tell you?

What micro-influencers can do for you. These mid-level brand evangelists are loaded with authenticity and millennial appeal, and may warrant your attention in implementing an influencer campaign.

Here’s what doctors really think about where they work. Gain insight from one doc who appreciates giving his insight on a hospital focus group. Something to think about for physician retention.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Looking to market to all generations but don’t have the budget? Not a problem. There’s one common demoninator across each audience. Can you guess what it is? Download our free guide: How to market healthcare to all generations, to learn more.

6 top takeaways from Iconosphere 2017.

6 top takeaways from Iconosphere 2017

The vibe was strategic, energizing and inspiring. Speakers spouted future-forward ideas, consumer insights and timely research. The result?  High level fuel to power successful strategies for our clients from the Iconosphere 2017 conference held in Vegas last week. Among the top 6 takeaways for me were:

  1. “Play deficit disorder” is a growing problem.  Uh oh, yet another disorder! Do you check emails while on vacation?  Believe sleep deprivation is a status symbol? Feel compelled to check things off your list? According to Rebeccca Kolls, consumer strategist, you may fall into the category of needing “permission to play.”  Don’t worry, you are not to blame, what with your childhood conditioning of “You can play when your room is clean” or “You can play after you practice piano.” With a productivity increase of 400 percent since the 1950s, we are losing the tug of war between productivity and play. And our guilt-fueled ability to play (which, by the way, is rated important by nine out of 10), has even been segmented into three groups, with marketing implications to match (think time - and money-saving solutions).
  1. “Privacy” wins over “Security” in communicating about consumer health data. Personal health data is big business, fueling healthcare innovation. However, we so fear giving it away. Why? Because it’s personal. We want to control and own our data. We’re not sure where it will go (e.g. Will it affect my insurance rates?). Research shows that marketers can gain more trust with the word, “privacy,” over “security,” and that communicating HOW health data provision will benefit you with specific positive outcomes reaps results. Think 23andMe DNA testing, which focuses upon the positive results of knowing your genetic history.
  1. A world without smart phones is on the horizon. Just when I finally got our 87-year-old mother to use one! In his Look Ma, No Hands keynote, Consumer Strategist Mike Garrison told us smart phones are on the way out. The audience was in shock and denial, which he quickly validated with video snippets of people saying, “I panic without my smart phone,” “I have my whole life in here,” and the ultimate, “but I love my smart phone.” Okay, so I’m not alone in my emotions, but the fact is sales have plateaued for smart phones, and smart phone features aren’t boosting demand anymore. People are talking about things like “smart phone addiction” and the need for “digital detox” (unplugging), all signaling the entry of the next big thing. Think Alexa, hands-free, device-agnostic ability for content fluidity. (Okay, I’ll try…)
  1. The “struggling moment” is the seed for all innovation. So says keynote speaker Bob Moseta and president of The Rewired Group. Since consumers lie to themselves and him about what they want, he finds the struggling moment for each purchase decision. His motto: “Bitchin’ ain’t switchin’!” And since he is the creator of that cool, little arrow that indicates the gas tank side of the car on  your dashboard, as well as the Snickers campaign that positioned the candy bar as food, not candy (You’re not you when you’re hungry), we believe him!
  1. 72 percent of Gen We high schoolers plan to start a business someday. That figure shocked me. And the same amount would trade a year of social media for their own car. They value their independence, know the value of a dollar (76 percent consider how much things cost), and celebrate diversity (the most diverse generation ever, with 48 percent non-white).
  1. Beatles Love Show is arguably the best show in Vegas. Or at least the best I’ve ever seen.  This endorphin-producing, multi-media explosion of creativity is a testament to the meaning of emotional connection – something we strive for every day with our work. We agreed we would have gladly paid twice our ticket price for the experience!

Need more insights? Check out From insights to innovation: Applying creativity to connect the dots.

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