6 top takeaways from Iconosphere 2017.

6 top takeaways from Iconosphere 2017

The vibe was strategic, energizing and inspiring. Speakers spouted future-forward ideas, consumer insights and timely research. The result?  High level fuel to power successful strategies for our clients from the Iconosphere 2017 conference held in Vegas last week. Among the top 6 takeaways for me were:

  1. “Play deficit disorder” is a growing problem.  Uh oh, yet another disorder! Do you check emails while on vacation?  Believe sleep deprivation is a status symbol? Feel compelled to check things off your list? According to Rebeccca Kolls, consumer strategist, you may fall into the category of needing “permission to play.”  Don’t worry, you are not to blame, what with your childhood conditioning of “You can play when your room is clean” or “You can play after you practice piano.” With a productivity increase of 400 percent since the 1950s, we are losing the tug of war between productivity and play. And our guilt-fueled ability to play (which, by the way, is rated important by nine out of 10), has even been segmented into three groups, with marketing implications to match (think time - and money-saving solutions).
  1. “Privacy” wins over “Security” in communicating about consumer health data. Personal health data is big business, fueling healthcare innovation. However, we so fear giving it away. Why? Because it’s personal. We want to control and own our data. We’re not sure where it will go (e.g. Will it affect my insurance rates?). Research shows that marketers can gain more trust with the word, “privacy,” over “security,” and that communicating HOW health data provision will benefit you with specific positive outcomes reaps results. Think 23andMe DNA testing, which focuses upon the positive results of knowing your genetic history.
  1. A world without smart phones is on the horizon. Just when I finally got our 87-year-old mother to use one! In his Look Ma, No Hands keynote, Consumer Strategist Mike Garrison told us smart phones are on the way out. The audience was in shock and denial, which he quickly validated with video snippets of people saying, “I panic without my smart phone,” “I have my whole life in here,” and the ultimate, “but I love my smart phone.” Okay, so I’m not alone in my emotions, but the fact is sales have plateaued for smart phones, and smart phone features aren’t boosting demand anymore. People are talking about things like “smart phone addiction” and the need for “digital detox” (unplugging), all signaling the entry of the next big thing. Think Alexa, hands-free, device-agnostic ability for content fluidity. (Okay, I’ll try…)
  1. The “struggling moment” is the seed for all innovation. So says keynote speaker Bob Moseta and president of The Rewired Group. Since consumers lie to themselves and him about what they want, he finds the struggling moment for each purchase decision. His motto: “Bitchin’ ain’t switchin’!” And since he is the creator of that cool, little arrow that indicates the gas tank side of the car on  your dashboard, as well as the Snickers campaign that positioned the candy bar as food, not candy (You’re not you when you’re hungry), we believe him!
  1. 72 percent of Gen We high schoolers plan to start a business someday. That figure shocked me. And the same amount would trade a year of social media for their own car. They value their independence, know the value of a dollar (76 percent consider how much things cost), and celebrate diversity (the most diverse generation ever, with 48 percent non-white).
  1. Beatles Love Show is arguably the best show in Vegas. Or at least the best I’ve ever seen.  This endorphin-producing, multi-media explosion of creativity is a testament to the meaning of emotional connection – something we strive for every day with our work. We agreed we would have gladly paid twice our ticket price for the experience!

Need more insights? Check out From insights to innovation: Applying creativity to connect the dots.

5 things Millennials want from healthcare.

America’s largest cohort is no longer a bunch of texting teens. They are adults, adults who are becoming parents and shopping for health insurance. And as Millennials look for healthcare, marketers need to know the best way to reach out to them. These quick facts will help healthcare providers better understand this generation.

  1. Show them how it works

    Millennials value safety more than other generations. They are a more insecure generation, growing up during hard times such as mass shootings and 9/11, according to CEB Iconoculture research. Healthcare providers should be aware of this, and welcome the opportunity to help Millennials through the healthcare process so they feel safe. Many will be buying health insurance for the first time. They will want to know the step-by-step process of purchasing healthcare, along with when to schedule appointments and tips for selecting a physician. Give them an authentic, easy-to-understand approach for this complicated process. Simple, yet relatable ads like Oscar insurance create the intimate feel Millennials are looking for.

    Procrastinators unite! Eventually.

  2. Create online access

    Online database Statista reports that Millennials (age 24-35 in 2017) have the highest internet usage compared to other age groups. Millennials can check flights, book a hotel or order a pizza through a smart phone. Why isn’t it the same with healthcare?

    Text updates on appointment times are common among some healthcare facilities. Henry Ford Health System is known for texting patients 24 hours before their appointment in order to confirm the time. And while many hospitals have the option to book online, not enough are advertising this information to the public. This is the process most Millennials are familiar with. Not only would this option be more convenient, but it would avoid the hassle of being put on hold over the phone.

  3. Post good reviews

    Popular shopping sites like Amazon have ways to access customer reviews, but healthcare is behind the curve. Reviews for healthcare facilities may already exist on some sites like Yelp, but it would be easier for the patient to go right to the source. Customer reviews on facilities and doctors are a way to gain the patient’s trust, and show them what they should expect. It’s also beneficial for you to see what your patients are saying.

  4. Provide details on mental health

    On college campuses in particular, healthcare providers are focusing on helping students manage physical and mental health. When talking to a Millennial about healthcare, it’s best to include topics like stress and anxiety. For university students, mental health is one of the highest growing issues to date. University Health Services are working to increase the amount of mental healthcare specialists on campus, and to create ads that focus on peace of mind. The University of California, Berkley does an excellent job at this. Their destress tweet is a great way to help promote mental wellbeing. The circle grows and shrinks in time to simulate deep breathing, calming down its viewers on #destressmonday.

    #DestressMonday
  5. Cover their children

    Believe it or not, more and more Millennials are becoming parents. Over 45 percent of Millennials are raising children, according to Iconoculture research. When Millennials are shopping for health insurance, healthcare providers should be prepared to insure not just one person, but a family unit. The issue will only become more common over the next few years. According to a 2013 Gallop poll, 87 percent of childless adults between 18-40 plan on having kids someday. In addition to insuring children, doctors should be prepared to walk Millennials through the process of pregnancy, nursing, and caring for their child.

Millennials differ from previous generations, from finding a healthcare provider to managing their personal needs. By personalizing healthcare for each generation, healthcare providers are able to further understand their patients and optimize treatment for every individual.

For more on healthcare marketing trends and insights, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Weekly Recap - May 12, 2017

Click, scroll, banner image, navigation. Is your website user-friendly? Not only is content key but ease of use it too. According to DMN, content is also about user’s experience on your site. Because let’s face it, if consumers are coming from social or interactive video, they expect good experience. Take a look.

DETAILS, please

UX is content: Content is UX. Calls to action, visuals, navigation buttons. Are these website items pure "content"? Or are they part of a website's user experience (UX)?

Is interactive video the next big thing? 3 creative examples from brands. It's hardly a revelation to say that online video content is phenomenally popular. Millions of words have been written on the subject, and millions more will no doubt follow.

3 ways to make your branded content bingeable. We have become a nation of bingers. Some 70 percent of us binge-watch TV and consume an average of five episodes per session.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Nostalgia marketing is winning with Millennials: How your brand can benefit. Although they’re often viewed as a tech-savvy and forward-thinking generation, Millennials love an excuse to throw it back to the good ol’ days.

6 ways brands are empowering women in 2017. In the first quarter of 2017, brands came together on a very similar mission.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

Nostalgia marketing is winning with Millennials: How your brand can benefit.

Nostalgia Marketing is Winning with Millennials - How Your Brand Can Benefit

Although they’re often viewed as a tech-savvy and forward-thinking generation, Millennials love an excuse to throw it back to the good ol’ days. They use apps like Timehop to resurface pictures from the past and are willing to pay top-dollar to see groups like Backstreet and Britney perform on their comeback tours. To leverage this, many brands are tapping into nostalgia to increase favorability of their products and encourage Millennials to open their wallets. But just how effective can nostalgia marketing be?

nos·tal·gia
noun

A sentimental longing or wistful affection for the past, typically for a period or place with happy personal associations.

Psychologists have been studying nostalgia for years. And although every generation and every individual expresses some degree of the word, Millennial nostalgia is a particularly interesting topic.

Millennials grew up in a period of economic turmoil. They saw the effects of the recession at a young age and are in the midst of a difficult job market. On top of that, Millennials have been inundated with technology and the internet for a large portion of their lives. The combination of these two might explain the reason so many 20- and 30-somethings are experiencing “early-onset nostalgia” – an information overload that compels them to remember simpler, easier times of the past.

Adidas and Sprite are two examples of brands that have tapped into Millennial nostalgia to recapture the market in recent years.

Adidas, a company that seemingly flew under the radar for the past decade, is seeing a major brand resurgence. In 2016, the company relaunched its classic Gazelle sneaker with an advertisement featuring Kate Moss that was shot and used 15 years prior (but with a slight twist).

Sprite, too, made a splash after bringing back its fan-favorite Sprite Remix last summer. Although it renamed the product Sprite Tropical Mix, Sprite kept the retro-inspired orange-on-white package design that fans loved from childhood.

More and more brands are using colors, flavors, music and fashion to tap into Millennial nostalgia. And with so many social networks in existence, they have their fair share of platforms to choose from when reaching their target audience.

If you’re considering using nostalgia to reach your brand’s Millennial consumers, it’s important to remember this: keep it sentimental, keep it lighthearted and keep it authentic. While there’s no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to nostalgia marketing, the right product, the right strategy and the right approach can have Millennials cracking smiles AND cracking their wallets open in no time.

Looking for more trends and insights? Subscribe to our Brogan Weekly Recap.

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Healthcare Checkup - May 2017

Are you putting your patients first? North Memorial’s recent campaign puts patients’ concerns and experiences at top of mind. Perhaps virtual reality is more your speed? Or are you preparing to respond to your direct competitors? Here’s everything you need to know.

VITAMIN B&P.

This healthcare system treats patients as valued customers. North Memorial is making sure patients are seen and heard.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

How marketers and users can benefit from virtual reality. Virtual Reality (VR) is becoming one of the largest opportunities using sight and sound to create real experiences without actually being present.

When it's smart to take jabs at the competition. A little competition can be a good thing. Especially when brands engage directly with competitors.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

Is your online presence up to snuff? As more digitally savvy Millennials become patients, they expect ease of use and interactivity when it comes to websites. See here.

Boost your online reputation. In the 21st century, you’re nobody unless you’re somebody online.

Serving the Millennial patient. As the millennial generation enters the workforce and becomes increasingly responsible for buying and accessing healthcare, organizations are gearing up for a new “regime.”

MONTHLY DOSE.

Does your hospital marketing budget have you down? Download our free guide, "How to market your hospital on a tight budget," to learn budget efficient marketing strategies.

Marketing Statement - Second Quarter 2017

Want to build your Millennial market share? Stop thinking like a Boomer. Sure they may get a little monthly stipend from mom and dad, but that in no way implies that they bank like their parents. They're using utility bill history to apply for loans and lurking in financial fiction for advice and inspiration. And just when you thought you’d figured out their fave social platform they get all post shy and feed sensitive. When all else fails, invest in blogs. It’s the gift that keeps on giving.

Millennials find clever ways to finance life. No score, no savings, no sweat. Plucky Millennials will find a way to finance that purchase and invest in themselves—with a little help from mom and dad.

5 fast facts about Millennials' financial habits. Bonus for Millennial singles. They also double as pickup lines. So, what’s your credit score? Shop here often? Tell me your latest Story and I’ll tell you mine.

Forget Bridget Jones. Millennial women prefer to know how you spend your money than your calories. Fans of "Money Diaries" at Refinery29, a New York-based website, pore over the routine financial minutiae of strangers' lives like your grandma working a Sudoku.

African Americans and banks: It's complicated. There are many reasons African Americans are more likely to be unbanked or underbanked. Here are three ways credit unions and banks can start making important inroads.

QUICK study

Hold that post. Social media users are scaling back. Blame it on the election. Or one too many tags. Some have comment remorse. All of this and more is giving users pause to reflect before sharing. What’s it mean for your brand?

Facebook and Google are losing the war against ad-blockers. Today, 11 percent of users have ad-blocking software. Male Millennial techies are partly responsible for the surge, but not totally. Is your target audience blocking your bits? How to win them back.

Is your banking investing in blogs? Content is kind of like that compounding interest your member service reps preach to young savers about. Get started or get better with 8 things every blogger must know.

SHARPEN the saw

Show then tell. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide, "Communicating with Visuals."

START a conversation

Share the Marketing Statement. Tell two friends. And so on.

5 fast facts about Millennials' financial habits.

5 fast facts about Millennials' financial habits.

With a median household income of $40,581, Millennials earn 20 percent less than their boomer parents did at the same age. Student debt is higher, home ownership is lower and spending habits are incredibly unique. Gone are the days of “stuff” and in are the days of experiences and saving, saving, saving. Confused about this cohort? Here are five fast facts about Millennial’s financial habits:

  1. Millennials are avid online shoppers. While this isn’t new, what they’re shopping for is. Millennials are now purchasing their necessities online vs. in-store to cut down on additional spending. Millennials are ordering toilet paper, toothpaste and other everyday items from sites like Amazon. “It’s no wonder we’re spending less at brick and mortar stores when it’s so much easier to buy just what we need when we purchase online.”
  2. They spend less on “stuff” and more on experiences. According to CEB Iconoculture research, this audience’s key differentiating values include adventure, expertise, creativity and ambition. Millennials are very interested in new experiences and building their life stories. Social platforms like Snapchat, Instagram and even Facebook have adapted this value system with their Stories feature and capabilities. Millennials and users alike are encouraged to share their stories and experiences. Who doesn’t want to try an escape room? Fowling? Goat yoga? Millennials live for experiences that they can add to their repertoire.
  3. Millennials save and invest more than boomers. While Millennials are perceived and portrayed as careless, they are actually more careful about how they invest and save their assets. According to Principal Financial Group, 51 percent of Millennials save or invest their money, while only 47 percent of Boomers do the same.
  4. Credit scores matter. According to a recent report, Millennials say credit scores matter…even when they are dating. While some dating apps claim they will match you based on credit scores (okay, that might be going a bit far), Millennials do care about the financial habits and standing of their potential significant other.
  5. Millennials are digital. While some still like writing good old fashioned checks, most will opt to pay or repay friends digitally. Whether they’re splitting restaurant tabs, sharing Lyft rides or paying for other services, Millennials are transferring funds with the tap or swipe of a finger.

Need more on financial marketing insights, sign up for our quarterly Marketing Statement.

Sephora makes it beautifully easy to get customer service on social media.

Sephora makes it beautifully easy to get customer service on social media.

Most people see a social media notification and feel excitement. Someone double tapped their selfie. Or commented on their livestream. Or tagged them in the most topical meme.

But, there are some people who see a social media notification and feel worry. Maybe a little panic. Perhaps even a little dread.

Who exactly are these people? Meet the social media managers of the world. For people in this position, reading online complaints can be an everyday occurrence. And the bigger the brand they work with, the more complaints there can be.

At all hours, people of all ages take to social media, the modern-day way to get customer service, with any issue they may have. And while it’s usually the most convenient method, it’s not always the most efficient.

There’s the reply. Then, there’s usually the need for more information. The forwarding of that information to the appropriate person. The resolving of the issue. And finally, returning back to the social media platform to give the user an update.

Ultimately, it’s a multi-step process that can take multiple hours (or multiple days, depending on how speedy your internal team is).

Surely there’s a way to simplify it, right?

Right.

Enter Sephora—the billion-dollar beauty company. To streamline their customer service on social media, they partnered with CashStar to deliver virtual gift cards, almost instantaneously.

Let’s say a customer tweets about her eye shadow palette breaking apart in transit. Instead of replying to collect all the information that’s needed, then issuing a refund or re-sending the product, Sephora can now tweet her a virtual gift card. Within minutes, she has the means to replace her product at no cost, with almost no wait.

Another benefit? Sephora only pays for the gift cards that are actually redeemed—which means they’re not absorbing the cost of a gift card that goes unused. And since Millennials seem to have a hard time hanging on to them, it could certainly save some dollars. In fact, according to CEB Iconoculture, nearly 40 percent of Millennials have lost a gift card before they had a chance to use it, compared with 25 percent of consumers overall.

So, could virtual gift cards be the way to go? To make things right for unhappy customers, and even to surprise and delight the most loyal?

CashStar, Sephora’s virtual gifting partner, shows there’s been a 51 percent redemption rate for digital gift cards within the first month of activation. (These ones seem a little easier to keep track of!) Compare this to a 33 percent redemption rate for plastic gift cards, and we think we’ve got our answer.

To stay up to date with all the advertising news you need, be sure to subscribe to our Weekly Recap.

Weekly Recap - March 24, 2017

Let’s talk social. Advertisers are investing more on social platforms. Millennials want socially responsible brands. And consumers are becoming more conscious of their social presence. Meanwhile, Instagram is making its platform better suited for shoppers. Let’s dive in.

DETAILS, please

Advertisers investing more in Facebook. Over the next 12 months, close to two-thirds of brands’ plan to increase their investment to the social platform.

Millennials driving brands to practice socially responsible marketing. How are Millennials going to collectively spend that $30 trillion?

A better shopping experience on Instagram. Discovery has been part of the Instagram experience from the beginning.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Social media users are scaling back: What this means for your brand. Today, consumers are becoming increasingly more aware, careful and sensitive to their own and other’s social presence.

Grocers are poised for Facebook greatness. Some brands struggle to find purpose on social media. Grocers aren’t among them.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

Like what you see? Share the Brogan Recap.

Grocers are poised for Facebook greatness.

Grocers are poised for Facebook greatness

Some brands struggle to find purpose on social media. For lack of relatable brand content, they resort to posting random memes, celebrating obscure holidays and sharing inspirational quotes. It can be painful to watch.

They must envy grocers. Most community managers would gladly surrender five years of brand content for the content potential on just one shelf of the cereal aisle. “What’s in your bowl?” “Bran. It’s not just for breakfast.” “Are you more Captain Crunch or Tony the Tiger?”

More than content, grocers have the benefit of a highly motivated audience. Consumers don’t have to be baited into liking grocer pages. They naturally seek them out, according to an FMI study.

About half (53 percent) of all shoppers—especially younger Millennials—connect with food retailers through social media. Seventy-three percent of Millennials (age 18-27 in 2017) and 59 percent of Gen Xers (age 38-51 in 2017) are influenced by social media.

Not just any social media. Facebook is the preferred channel for grocery shoppers of all generations. Millennials use it most, followed by Gen Xers, Boomers and Matures. They use social to scout sales and promotions (73 percent) and new products (72 percent), and to find recipes (59 percent). This according to a separate study by UPS called Pulse of the Online Shopper.

What are grocers doing with all that potential? Not nearly enough, per yet another study by Retail Feedback Group (RFG).

RFG found that while most (87 percent) supermarket shoppers follow one or more social media channels, just 25 percent have friended or connected to their primary grocery store. This is most likely because grocers are not claiming their Pages or spending scant resources to manage them.

Enough already.

Attention Grocers: Your consumers want to be (Facebook) friends

It’s time to get serious about social media, else customers may fall in “like” with a competitor. Data suggest Facebook is the most popular platform for grocery shopping, so start there. If you’ve already claimed your business page and just need a little inspiration, skip to number 2 below. If this is all still very new to you, begin at the top.

  1. Claim your page. Facebook created a step-by-step tutorial for just this occasion. You’ll need a profile picture, which will serve as the main icon of your page. The icon is square. Obvious choices are brand logo or store name. You’ll also want to have a cover photo handy. This is the dominant image that stretches across the top of your Facebook page. The official dimensions are 851x315 pixels. This is prime real estate and should be reserved for marketing campaigns and longer-term promotions.
     
  2. Evaluate your resources. Identify a champion who will be responsible for managing the page. It will be their job to regularly update and post to the page and follow user activity. This position is known as the community manager. Identify a backup community manager in the event of illness, vacation or job change. The community manager will likely come from your marketing team as social media is part of the marketing function.
     
  3. Follow the competition. Peruse a few months or more of the competition’s Facebook feed. Look for posts that generate significant engagement, as well as campaign themes and regular promotions.
     
  4. Develop a plan. Facebook business pages come with lots of features--analytics, reporting, security and access, and more. Take the time to understand how to manage the platform and how you’ll measure success before diving into content. Pay close attention to analytics, reporting and access. Once you understand the tools, create a plan that includes cadence (how often you’ll post weekly), communication (your ideal response time), and monitoring (how you’ll keep abreast of activity and respond to both positive and negative comments).  
     
  5. Create a content calendar. Everything on Facebook is content—copy, images, video. It’s all considered content. This is what your consumers are craving. Start with a quarter, just three months of content. Original content is ideal because it will be most relevant to your followers. But it’s okay to share complementary content once or twice a week from brands that you carry. Your content calendar should support your marketing strategy. Think in terms of sales goals and traffic.
     
  6. Promote your page. Boosting posts can be an effective and inexpensive way to advertise outside of your fan base. This video explains how to boost a post in under two minutes.

For more on content development check out “Content marketing: 4 rules to follow.”

Millennials find clever ways to finance life.

Millennials find clever ways to finance life.

Young, cash-strapped Millennials are leaning on their parents for help today. Still they’re not letting old-fashioned barriers like credit scores stand in the way of big purchases. Meanwhile, their affluent counterparts are using robo-advisers to build their next eggs.

Millennials aren’t the first generation to tap the Bank of ‘Rents. But they’re particularly sensitive about the handouts, according to CEB Iconoculture research.

Forty percent of young 20-somethings living away from home after school receive an average $3,000 annually from their parents, per a study reported in the New York Times. Those who live in the city get almost $1,000 more a year in support than those who live in rural areas.

Parental support varies by career pursuits. For example, right-side brainers tend to be more needy than left siders, according to the research. Of those who regularly receive financial assistance:

  • 53 percent work in the arts and design world
  • 37 percent work in healthcare
  • 30 percent work in blue-collar jobs
  • 29 percent work in personal services

No credit? No problem.

When Millennials do need credit, they’re not letting a little thing like credit score get in the way.

A pilot program launched by Fair Isaac, the company behind FICO, lets consumers with no credit history use utility bill payment history instead. SoFi and Float are also rewriting lending rules, enabling young adults to apply for emergency loans and mortgages without the benefit of credit history.

Float bases its lending decisions on bank transactions for the two past years. This lets credit newbies get into the game and saves Float the expense of pulling FICO data.

Millennials build nest eggs with algorithms.

Millennials are investing differently too, thanks to plucky internet startups and trusty algorithms.

For as little as a few bucks a month, online companies like Stash and WiseBanyan enable investors to start building their nest eggs.

Stash invites users to learn how to invest in themselves by selecting companies that complement their lifestyle and aspirations. They even have examples of investors who might look like you—the activist, the techie, the globetrotter and the trendsetter. Each persona includes a tidy sample portfolio.

$1 buys investors a seat at the table at WiseBanyan, where basic accounts are free and clients upgrade to fee-for-service only when necessary. Like Stash, the content is very accessible and easily digestible. It’s investing for the every man.

Millennials will find a way.

Whether scraping together enough money to pay the rent or planning retirement, Millennials will find a way. For brands to connect, they have to first understand the financial challenges Millennials are wrestling with. Younger Millennials (22-29 in 2017) are in the midst of quarter-life, reflecting on student loan debt, career choices, relationships and zip codes. Older Millennials (30-39 in 2017) are confronting marriage, parenthood and homeownership. Some have even flipped the script with their parents, providing them financial assistance.

Now, get plucky—Millennial style. Don’t expect them to be shoe-horned into traditional products and services. They’ll look elsewhere. Think convenience, flexibility and practicality. And if it can be accessed via smartphone, all the better. Stymied? Go to the source for inspiration. Host a brainstorming session with Millennial staffers or customers. Start by asking them what financial issues keep them up at night and advance to solutions.

Interested in more on the financial marketing front? Subscribe to our free quarterly newsletter, Marketing Statement.

Self-care and what it means for healthcare marketers.

Self-care and what it means for healthcare marketers.

You know it is 2017 when you can officially count a glass of wine or reading a good book as part of your self-care routine.

But, what does self-care really mean? According to CEB Iconoculture research, self-care encompasses the mental, physical, emotional and spiritual activities consumers engage in to enhance their overall health.

Self-care is a want.

Today, 90 percent of consumers are already partaking in self-care activities. In fact, consumers across generations are deeming self-care as a necessity:

  • 59 percent of Matures
  • 47 percent of Boomers
  • 54 percent of Gen X
  • 49 percent of Millennials

In looking at values on the rise for these consumer groups, CEB Iconoculture research suggests that "health," "relaxation" and "comfort" have all seen increases within the past five years. Conversation surrounding self-care has also seen a dramatic shift. In 2008, people associated words such as: health, home, nurse, treatment, medicine, doctor, etc. with self-care. In 2015, consumers accounted for a much broader association, with words like: life, people, work, writing, family, friends, love, book, talk, etc.

Self-care: blending of healthy and non-healthy behaviors.

When it comes to self-care, consumers are considering practices that involve both healthy and non-healthy activities. In addition to going to the gym, to yoga or getting their annual checkup, consumers are also indulging in non-healthy behaviors. Perhaps it's indulging with a cupcake or paczki. Binge watching the latest series added to Netflix, or even going to the movies. Did we mention having a glass of wine? All of these activities fall under the umbrella of self-care and touch on the mental, physical, emotion and spiritual practices consumers are involved with.

Per CEB Iconoculture research, 71 percent of U.S consumers view mental and physical health as closely linked and don't separate them when engaging in self-care activities. Across the generations, 60 percent of Millennials, 76 percent of Xers and 71 percent of Boomers agree with the previous statement.

What this means for your brand.

The self-care notion isn't new. For years there has been a blurring of "health" and "wellness" and what it means to consumers. Brands getting it right are acknowledging consumers' struggles, acknowledging genders and generations.

For more on healthcare marketing trends and insights, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Interested in marketing healthcare to the generations? Download our free guide.

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  • When launching a startup, resources are very constrained and a startup has to pick its partners very carefully and with deliberation. There were many services that we have had to forego in the early stages of our company, Memloom. One crucial need, however, was identifying and aligning with a strong marketing partner who could help us with our brand, positioning and... More

  • We have been working with the Brogan team for the past 18 months. The Brogan team has truly been our marketing partner. They guided us through development our brand and messaging. They lead our our website redesign and deployment. And they provide excellent counsel on business development and market entry strategies. More

  • From the very first meeting we had with Brogan & Partners, it was clear that they had done their research on PREZIO Health, our competitors and the industry.  It has been  a very positive experience working with the Brogan & Partners team to re-design all of our service and product sheets as well as the total re-design of our website.  Their creativity is top-... More

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