Weekly Recap - September 15, 2017

Girl power! How a small statue rocked the advertising world. Not just Millennials. One-third of the U.S. population cares about company reputation. One-click ordering is the answer. Quick and painless checkouts could mean billions for retailers. Want to get the most out of your video campaigns? Contextual targeting may help improve your reach.

DETAILS, Please

Fearless Girl stole the world’s heart and brought this company millions in free marketing. The iconic girl standing opposite to Wall Street’s Charging Bull created a social media storm, but the marketing campaign had a deeper purpose. Don’t miss these insights from the campaign’s creators.

‘Corpsumers’ care as much about a brand’s values as its products. Millennials, high-earners, and parents seem to agree. Check out these stats from MWWPR to see how ethics affect consumer  buying decisions.

How the end of Amazon’s ‘1-Click’ patent will change web-wide checkouts. Before Prime, the simplicity of checking out was a huge component of Amazon loyalty. Now, retailers all over the web may start implementing simplified purchasing.

When it comes to marketing on YouTube, context is key. Consumers seeking out and watching certain content provides distinct signals about what they may be interested in buying. Here’s how to use those signals to reach the "unknown" demographic.

Meanwhile, back at the RANCH

Skinny websites, snackable content and more from Digital Summit Detroit. Digital Summit Detroit 2017 delivered. In less than two days, the conference covered all means of email, content, website and mobile trends. Lots for marketers to consider and capitalize upon. A few highlights we just had to share. 

THE Topic of conversation

Millennials. Discover who Millennials are, why it’s important to market to them, and how you can increase brand loyalty and engagement. Download our free whitepaper “8 Rules of Marketing to Millennials.”

SHARING is CARING

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Healthcare Checkup - September 2017

Highlights here on how Hurricane Harvey is bringing out the best in healthcare workers, brands and doctors. Plus new healthcare social media insights, Ad Block strategies, and telltale signs of website demise.

VITAMIN B&P.

6 healthcare social media insights, with tips. Are you working in the world of healthcare social media? Here’s the perfect prescription for your digital properties. Just scan these six insights.  

5 doc training tips on patient-centered care. Did you know doctors wait an average of only 18 seconds before interrupting patients? Learn tips on understanding their mindset, physician empathy training and more to improve patient experience.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

Why the worst disasters can bring out the best in brands. While SE Texas begins its long recovery from hurricane devastation, one furniture store has transformed two of its locations into temporary housing for victims. Brands big and small can excel in a crisis, adding depth to consumer relationships.

Ad Block isn’t as scary as you think. Truth is, it’s manageable and even beneficial for marketers and consumers alike.

8 signs your website is past its prime. Time is not kind to websites. In the course of a year or even months, a high performing site can be dealt brutal blows that negatively impact results. Take a hard look at your site for telltale signs of aging.

INDUSTRY PULSE.

Hurricane Harvey and how you can help. Special message from AHA President & CEO Rick Pollack on the around-the-clock response of hospitals and health systems.

5 ways virtual doctors can help during a natural disaster. Harvey puts the importance of telemedicine in a whole new light. See it from the eyes of this Houston virtual medical physician determined to help the stranded.

Less than 1 in 10 healthcare organizations treat consumer expectation as a “high priority.” New Kaufman Hall study points to five key insights around healthcare consumer-based strategies.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Looking to market to all generations but don’t have the budget? Not a problem. There’s one common denominator across each audience. Can you guess what it is? Download our free guide, How to market healthcare to all generations, to learn more.

Why the worst disasters can bring out the best in brands.

Why the worst disasters can bring out the best in brands.
Photo credit: Rick Wilking, Reuters
A man and his dog wade through the Hurricane Harvey floodwaters in Houston.

After Hurricane Katrina swept through New Orleans, Tide’s Loads of Hope program rolled into town with a fleet of trucks filled with Whirlpool washers and dryers. The 2005 disaster left thousands homeless with little more than the clothes on their backs, but Tide provided relief and offered free laundry services for families in need.

Similarly, when residents of Flint, Michigan were unable to drink tap water for fear of lead poisoning, PUR sent scientists, faucet-mounted water purifiers and replacement cartridges to the city. "We are a company that is in a unique position to help because we have a product that does eliminate 99.0 percent of lead, and that's the PUR faucet mount system. And we thought this would be an opportunity to make sure we are able to help people in a way that only we can," said Sharon Robustell of PUR, in a prepared statement.

While southeastern Texas begins its long recovery from the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Harvey, Gallery Furniture is giving shelter to thousands of displaced residents. The Houston-based chain store has transformed two of its locations into temporary housing for victims of the historic tropical storm, offering food, beds and restrooms for anyone in need.

Brands big and small can excel in a crisis, adding depth to consumer relationships that may trump purchase barriers like price and convenience. This is particularly true when the brand cause aligns with the brand promise, product or service.

PetSmart, for example, is giving $1 million to help animal welfare agencies working to rescue, relocate and care for pets that have become homeless due to the storm. The company is also donating supplies and pet food. United Airlines is giving bonus miles to members who donate to disaster relief organizations providing aid to Texas, and FedEx has committed $1 million in cash and transportation support to deliver supplies and medical aid to victims.

Consumers expect more from brands than profitability.

Don’t wait for disaster to strike to find your brand’s corporate responsibility. Being socially responsible comes with the territory. In fact, today’s consumers expect it. 

According to a global study by Havas Worldwide and Market Probe International, 73 percent of consumers believe that brands have a responsibility to do more than just generate profits. Companies that do good may be more successful when it comes to attracting and retaining talent.

In a study by Morning Consult for Fortune Magazine that tested out this theory, nearly two-thirds of the 2,000 respondents (ages 18 to 34) were at least somewhat more likely to work for a company that gave to charity than one that did not. Older generations aren’t quite as corporate-philanthropy-disposed, with 59 percent of those between the ages of 35 and 44, and 47 percent of people between the ages of 45 and 64 reporting values that align with Millennials.

How to find the right cause for your brand. 

There are endless ways your brand can make a difference. But what makes sense for you? CEB Iconoculture suggests the following:

Focus on the cause. Consumers will follow. Patagonia values sustainability. To prove it, they launched a campaign on Black Friday to discourage consumers from buying a popular jacket on the busiest shopping day of the year. The “Don’t Buy This Jacket” campaign encouraged consumers to reconsider consumption and embrace sustainability. The brand proved its sincerity by illustrating its commitment to recycling and environmentally-conscious practices. Patagonia loyalists and wannabes understood.

Do what you can with what you have. Whirlpool is more than just a manufacturer of washers and dryers. The brand gives people confidence that they’re ready for work, school or play. That’s the essence of the Whirlpool Care Counts program. Kids are more likely to skip school when they don’t have clean clothes. So, the brand is helping keep at-risk kids in school by installing washers and dryers in underprivileged schools.

Want another example of a brand that’s discovered an ideal philanthropic match? Check out Consumers Energy Generation Genius.

5 doc training tips on patient-centered care.

5 doc training tips on patient-centered care.

In the world of healthcare marketing, we all know that doctors are an important part of the market mix. But while your Patient Experience Department is all abuzz about patient-centered care and improved patient experience, are your doctors on board with that? Here are some quick tips on preparing your doctors for a patient-centered mindset.

Understand their mindset.

Doctors can be a tough audience, so first it’s vital to understand where they’re coming from. Throughout the ten to twelve years of schooling it takes to become an MD or DO, many med students are told the same thing: make a decision, it’s all on you. They are trained to be the sole decider in actual life-or-death situations, and they often block their emotions in order to get the job done. This mentality creates doctors that are confident leaders, but not always team players. Thankfully, there are now programs that are can be of immense help.

Promote empathy training.

On average, doctors wait just 18 seconds before interrupting patients’ narratives of their symptoms. Another study discovered that in over 60 percent of cases, patients misunderstood directions after a visit to their doctor’s office. Empathy training is a golden opportunity to improve doctor-patient relationships and patient ratings. While sympathy is defined as feeling sorry for someone, empathy is the ability to stand in someone else’s shoes and understand them.

Geritalk, designed specifically for physicians who care for older adults with life-limiting illness, and Oncotalk, designed to help oncologists tackle difficult conversations, are two such breakthrough programs. As one physician explains, “Oncologists don’t truly lack empathy. What physicians may lack are skills that impart the true empathy they have-skills that can be learned and practiced…”

This knowledge is beginning to become embedded in a doctor’s training. As of 2015, the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) contains questions on human behavior and psychology. Empathy courses are beginning to be offered in medical school and patient satisfaction scores are now being used to calculate Medicare reimbursement. This boost in empathy is shown to boost patient reviews, gain patient trust, decrease physician burnout and lower the rist of malpractice.

Know the power of listening.

While a cardiologist knows a myriad of information on heart disease, it’s impossible to recap all that information to her patients in one checkup.

Perhaps a patient is at risk for heart disease, like hypertension or a stroke. That’s scary stuff. And patients may not even be able to process medical information if they’re thinking about their own safety, or how this would affect their family. The patient doesn’t need to listen better, the doctor does. Part of modern training includes allowing the patient to speak for at least two minutes, uninterrupted.

Redefine the doctor-patient relationship.

The Council of Accountable Physician Practices (CAPP) did a study that found that out of 22 healthcare delivery attributes, at the top of the list for both patients and doctors was the doctor-patient relationship. These were closely followed by evidence-based medicine and care coordination. What does the doctor-patient relationship look like? Patients want doctors that care about them.

Henry Ford’s All For You branding does just that— create a mentality that healthcare is all for the individual patient. Rather than featuring doctors and high tech equipment, content is focused on everyday patient stories, based upon the uniqueness of each person.

Be respectful.

Both marketers and doctors have done extensive research in their field. It’s important to respect each other’s thoughts and preferences. What doesn’t violate HIPAA may violate copright law, Marketing 101, or vice versa. Remember not only to listen to patients, but to each other. This level-headedness and empathy for each other will result in the best marketing outcome.

We don’t skip a beat. For more on healthcare, subscribe to the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

6 ways brands are empowering women in 2017.

In the first quarter of 2017, brands came together on a very similar mission, to empower women. According to CEB Iconoculture research, 63 percent of women say obstacles continue to make it harder for women than men today, while only 41 percent of men think women still face obstacles.

To highlight these disparities, here are six ways brands are changing the conversation and empowering women in 2017.

1. Brawny: #StrengthHasNoGender.

Brawny: #StrengthHasNoGender.
(Photo credit: Adweek)

This year, the 43-year-old paper towel brand got a makeover. As part of its Women’s History Month campaign, the brand replaced its trademark lumberjack with a defiant, flannel wearing woman. In an Adweek interview, the agency’s VP of marketing explained, “This year we wanted women to see themselves as strong and resilient, and one way to do that was to show them on the packaging.” Household goods already have a brand advantage with women in the trust department. Who knows where this may take Brawny.

2. Microsoft: Make What’s Next.

The tech brand has recently made it their mission to highlight the growing gap in female STEM (for science, technology, engineering and math) researchers. With their spot “Make What’s Next,” Microsoft encourages young girls to follow their dreams and stay in STEM.

3. McCann: A fearless girl.

McCann: A fearless girl.
(Photo credit: Adweek)

In honor of International Women’s Day, McCann New York erected a statue of a girl facing off the infamous Wall Street Charging Bull. The statue, which has since been removed from site after the permit expired, was to emphasize the power of women in leadership. The girl stood fearlessly in the face of the bull for over a month, serving as a powerful symbol of female strength.

4. Loganberry Books: Gender gap in fiction.

Loganberry Books: Gender gap in fiction.
(Photo credit: Adweek)

To demonstrate the gender gap in fiction, this Ohio bookstore turned all male authored books around in their bookstore so only the works of women were in view. The store operated under this remodel for about a week, as the storeowner wanted to celebrate generations of female authors and inspire the next.    

5. Jack Daniels: His and Hers.

No explanation necessary here.

  1. Ann Taylor: This is Ann.

To celebrate 60 years of business and in honor of Women’s History Month, Ann Taylor debuted their “This is Ann,” video. The minute-long spot highlights the good, the bad and the ugly struggles women have faced throughout the years while thanking the women that have come before them and paved the way.

Are you a woman? We value your thoughts and insights and invite you to join our Brogan Talks to Women Survey.

Weekly Recap - March 17, 2017

Do you trust brands? An eMarketer study found that most women are skeptical. In fact, 48 percent have a hard time trusting financial service brands, 37 percent distrust healthcare brands and 24 percent distrust nonprofits. Even with social activism on the rise, Millennials are dubious about cause marketing to be skeptical. Still they yearn to be philanthropic. Where’s the give? Seeing isn’t necessarily believing. Digiday suggests brands’ viewability isn’t the be-all end-all. Let’s break it down.

DETAILS, please

What brands can do to win the trust of women. Brand trust seems to matter more than ever, though it may be harder than ever to build that trust.

Infographic: What consumers really think about cause marketing. With social activism on the rise, more brands are aligning themselves with philanthropic causes in hopes of burnishing their reputations—and their bottom lines.

Focus on viewability, but don’t make it the goal. It seems like a total no-brainer: No one wants to pay for ads that can’t be seen. But viewability is just one factor in an effective campaign.

Meanwhile back at the RANCH

Millennials find clever ways to finance life. Millennials aren’t the first generation to tap the Bank of ‘Rents. But they’re particularly sensitive about the handouts.

THE Topic of conversation

Visual communication. Did you know that 93 percent of communication is visual? Amplify your marketing and discover how your brand can communicate visually. Download our latest free guide "Communicating with Visuals."

SHARING is CARING

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Anti-drunk driving messages cause marketers should know.

Coming off the holiday season, most of us attended parties with family and friends where alcohol was served. And it is a strong possibility the majority of the people in attendance drove home, even if they indulged a little too much. According to MADD, in 2015 “Adults drank too much and drove about 121 million times per year.” Why is it that so many people make the decision to drive under the influence, especially with services like Uber and Lyft that exist in most cities and suburbs? Have they not seen any of the anti-drunk driving ads out there that show the potential consequences of driving under the influence? Take, for example, the Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning spot “Sticks With You.” Not only does it tug at the heart strings but it shows viewers the consequences drinking and driving can have on the people around you.

It turns out anti-drunk driving ads have been pretty effective over the years in reducing the number of fatalities related to drinking and driving. In fact, according to The Drinks Business, these types of fatalities are “at an all-time low having decreased 53% since 1982.” But what if consumers could actually experience the results of a drunk-driving crash firsthand? Could that help significantly reduce or even eliminate drunk-driving fatalities completely?
 
Diageo: "Decisions."
 
Diageo, an adult beverage company, has pioneered virtual reality technology that allows consumers to experience the journey of a vehicle and passengers whose driver is under the influence, ultimately ending in a tragedy.

Virtual Reality is an innovative way to spread awareness about the dangers of drunk driving and hopefully give consumers a bit of a scare to help change their behavior. Do you think this type of advertising will be effective and further lower the rate of drunk-driving fatalities? Let us know in the comments below.
 
For more, catch up on the latest and greatest in cause marketing here.

 

Healthcare Checkup - December 2016

Tis the season for giving, forging connections and the flu? Yes, that’s right. Let’s take a look.

Give: Rethink Breast Cancer has created thoughtful Give-A-Care products to gift one-by-one or send curated packages to loved ones diagnosed with breast cancer.

Connections: Celebrity endorsements may seem like a trend of the past, but they are still used in several marketing campaigns today. And believe it or not, Millennials are sticking with their pediatricians well into adulthood.

Flu: While the flu season is in full swing, Uber is making it more convenient for consumers interested in receiving the flu shot. See here.

VITAMIN B&P.

Rethink Breast Cancer makes it easy to show you care. The young women’s breast cancer movement has created thoughtful Give-A-Care products that help friends diagnosed with breast cancer get through the tough time ahead.

Healthcare marketing: Do celebrities still resonate? As we’ve recently seen in the latest Cigna TV spot, celebrities definitely capture our attention. (Especially when Dr. McDreamy is talking to us.) But, does this marketing tactic still resonate?

Millennials are sticking with pediatricians into adulthood. From 2002 to 2012, pediatric office visits by patients 19 and older grew from less than a million to 2.4 million.

Flu season driving you nuts? There's an app for that: #UberForHealth. The ride-sharing enterprise advertised their new promotional effort.

MARKETING SUPPLEMENTS.

Everything marketers need to know about paid search. How many times have you searched for something online? How many of those times did you search from your mobile device?

INDUSTRY PULSE.

From #GivingTuesday to patient centered storytelling, social media has seen quite the transformation this year. Take a look.

Healthcare embraces #GivingTuesday with innovative fundraising. With momentum on social media and a partnership with the United Nations Foundation, #GivingTuesday has quickly become a vast philanthropic effort led by Millennials.

How healthcare marketers use social media. Gamification. Disruption. Value-based messaging. See how healthcare marketers can tap into social media to share their brand message.

MONTHLY DOSE.

Does your hospital marketing budget have you down? Download our free guide, "How to market your hospital on a tight budget," to learn budget efficient marketing strategies.

Flu season driving you nuts? There's an app for that: #UberForHealth.

Flu season driving you nuts? There's an app for that: #UberForHealth.

UberX. UberXL. BLACK. SUV. UberHEALTH? 

Yes, you read that correctly. UberHEALTH.

On October 25, the ride-sharing enterprise advertised their new promotional effort, #UberForHealth.

When users in participating cities opened the app between 11am and 3pm, Uber’s temporary “HEALTH” option could be selected in attempt to stay well this season. The campaign was designed to deliver flu care packages and flu shots for up to five individuals from a registered nurse through Passport Health, for free. No tricks, no gimmicks, just the tap of a button.

If you are a firm believer in the expression “good things come in threes” this marketing tactic probably appeals to you– free Uber, free care package, and last but certainly not least, free flu shots.

Although the shot is optional, Uber hopes their promotion will encourage users to take control of their health, along with keeping the health of others in mind. As reported by Uber, each year the flu affects 20 percent of the population and receiving the flu shot reduces the risk of passing your germs by 50-60 percent. Uber’s overall goal may be to spread buzz from person to person about the convenient transportation business, but UberHEALTH aspires to do the opposite for viruses and prevent illnesses from circulating.

How this helps Uber.

2016 is not Uber’s first rodeo testing out UberHEALTH. However, unlike last year, everything is free – and to be quite frank, everyone loves free. Uber’s pilot campaign presents users and non-users an incentive to try Uber for reasons other than convenient traveling.  

Even though Uber is merely getting their feet wet in the healthcare pool, we can’t help but wonder what is next? Will they tap into unlimited delivery services? Take over the world? (okay maybe not that far, but you get the idea).

Whatever the next big thing may be, the innovative campaign supports the multibillion dollar company in breaking out of the traditional “Uber box” and encourages more brainstorming on how Uber could ultimately be used. More uses = More business.

How this helps the healthcare industry.  

It’s no secret hospitals are on top of the latest technology in their facilities, but campaigns like UberHealth force innovation outside the hospital walls as well.

Although it may not be ideal to bring the nurse to the patient in every situation, hospitals are taking the idea of convenience integration and running with it. MedStar Health can be seen as a prime example when their partnership with Uber was announced in January 2016  in hopes of helping patients with transportation to and from appointments. According to research provided by BMC Health Services Research, with every patient that does not show up to an appointment, a health organization loses money.

Keeping that in mind, incorporating concepts like transportation services is not only beneficial to the patient, it is also one small step towards the future for healthcare industries.

How this helps you.

Now more than ever, the hours in the day seem to be disappearing and to-do lists are growing. Busy mom, hard-working Millennial, stay-at-home parent, regardless of who you are, everyone strives to master the art of fitting it all in. This year, Uber helped individuals scratch the flu shot off those long lists.

The ride hauling company has been mainly used for getting from point A to point B, but did you ever think to use Uber to receive your seasonal flu shot? Chances are, probably not. For current Uber users and non-users alike, no matter the success of UberHealth, this may possibly encourage you to find new ways to utilize the service for your benefit, even when you never thought you could.

According to DMR research, more than eight million people are consistent Uber users and two billion rides and counting have been taken. With figures like that, it is no wonder why Uber is constantly trying to find new ways to help customers get “more for their ride.” Uber Eats, Uber’s Vote campaign, and Dogs of Uber are models for how Uber is expanding for their own business, but more importantly, for you.

UberHEALTH + Healthcare + You.

Although information has not been released on how successful the pilot campaign has been this year, one thing appears to be evident; innovation is surely in the air – and it appears to be beneficial to all.

Don’t fret – if you missed the chance to try UberHEALTH, there is always next year to give them a “shot” (and they’ll be sure to give you one too!).

For more on healthcare marketing trends, sign up for our monthly edition of the Brogan Healthcare Checkup.

Rethink Breast Cancer makes it easy to show you care.

Rethink Breast Cancer makes it easy to show you care

When my brother’s wife was diagnosed with breast cancer, we bought her a tablet to pass the time during her recovery. She loves to read, so it seemed a good choice. A year later, when my husband’s sister was diagnosed, we gave her a pressed metal necklace.

Why? I have no idea. My mother-in-law reacted in typically blunt fashion. “Why are you giving her presents? It’s cancer, not a birthday party.”

We just wanted to do something to let her know we were thinking of her. That we love her. And to somehow bridge the 4,200 miles that separated us from her while she battled cancer without us. So many things come to mind now that she’s four years cancer-free. But when you’re spinning with worry, thoughtful gift ideas rarely come in focus.

Rethink Breast Cancer gets it. The young women’s breast cancer movement has created thoughtful Give-A-Care products that help friends diagnosed with breast cancer get through the tough time ahead. More than a gesture, the collection includes meaningful gifts that acknowledge what’s she’s tackling, and helps support her along the way.

You can gift goodies a-la-carte or send carefully curated packages that come in small, medium and large. Items range from the practical—a planner, hand sanitizer, water bottle, tissue and tote—to the comfy—plush hoodies and a 100 percent cashmere toque that promises both warmth and style. There’s even a children’s book for moms to help with difficult conversations and can’t-we-ever-have-a-normal-conversation candy hearts inscribed with texts like “u r my rock.” All gifts come with a complementary care guidelines catered to young women who have a breast cancer diagnosis.

What’s more, Give-a-Care products keep on giving. All proceeds from sales fund Rethink Breast Cancer. The nonprofit is dedicated to raise awareness about breast cancer in those under the age of 40.

Talk about a feel-good fest. The giver feels like she’s helping. The recipient feels understood. And the nonprofit gets more funding to fuel great ideas to help more patients.

This kind of brand authenticity is what consumers crave across industries. There’s nothing like a confident decision to make people loyal advocates. The trick is to know your audience. Rethink Breast Cancer knows its target audience down to the cellular level. 

Speaking of brand authenticity, download our free whitepaper “3 Rules to Creating an Authentic Brand.” And discover which brands are getting real and how to market authenticity across genders, generations and ethnic groups.

Weekly Recap - April 27, 2015

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

Enough SAID enlists donors for rape justice
The non-profit Michigan Women’s Foundation launched Enough SAID to drive awareness of rape prevention.

Hashing Out Hashtags: What They Are & How to Use Them [Infographic]
These helpful tips and tricks demonstrate the importance and the proper frequency of using hashtags on social platforms.

how to use hashtags

Advertising + entertainment = branded content. Three techniques you should know.
Branded content, also known as “branded entertainment” or “advertainment,” is the fusion of entertainment or editorial content with brands and branded information.

Social Advertising: Are You Adding Value or Just Begging For Attention?
While consumers often don’t mind interacting with brands on their own terms, they’ve grown more savvy at avoiding ads otherwise.

STUDY: Interaction with Instagram Posts Trounces Facebook, Twitter
When it comes to interaction with posts, Instagram blows away parent company Facebook and Twitter, according to a recent study by social analytics provider Quintly.

To Engage Audiences with Storytelling, Don't Just Think Like a Pop Star
Engaging consumers deeply and long-term through storytelling has become the means to driving loyalty and revenue growth.

Weekly Recap - April 6, 2015

Social media is constantly evolving, with vigilant bloggers following every new app, rule and Facebook flicker. We sift through hundreds of blogs weekly to keep on top of developments and seek out new client opportunities. It’s our job. And we like to share. So, don’t fret about what you might be missing. We’ve got your Cliffs Notes.

How Often Should Companies Blog? [New Benchmark Data]
Depending on your company size and business type, these helpful benchmarks show how the number of blog posts published monthly and in total can affect traffic and leads.

why companies should blog

The Ideal Length for All Your Social Media Posts [Infographic]
Users are less likely to click if you don't optimize each post for both your choice of words and the length of the update.

Are Men Bigger Digital Shoppers than Women?
Stereotypes be gone! It turns out that males click the digital “buy” button more frequently than females, according to January 2015 research by Bronto Software.

Which Brands Are Taking Advantage of Instagram?
Instagram will boast more than 100 million US users by 2018, eMarketer estimates, and this year, the social network’s audience will rise by nearly 21% to 77.6 million users.

Dove's Latest Film Makes Women Choose If They Are 'Beautiful' or 'Average'
Over the past decade, Dove has had a laser focus, challenging women's concepts of beauty and championing "real women" to see themselves as beautiful.

Carousel Ads Debut on Instagram
Instagram announced the launch of carousel ads last month, and launch partners Showtime, Banana Republic, Old Navy, L’Oréal Paris and Samsung showed off their uses of the advertising feature in a post on the Instagram for Business blog.

A Simple Guide to Using Hashtags
When used properly, though, hashtags can be a powerful marketing tool in helping drive brand recognition, boost conversions, and positively impact customer loyalty. 

The Power of Brand Authenticity on Social Media [Infographic]
This infographic outlines how authenticity can drive high returns — for both brands and independent creators — and engender consumer trust.

6 Customer Service Tips for Brands on Facebook
Author, speaker and small business coach Barry Moltz shared a half-dozen customer service tips with Facebook for Business.

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  • Brogan & Partners has worked on a wide variety of health issues for us over the years. They have not only consistently provided innovative ideas and award winning campaigns, but they continue to help us work towards our overall goal of improving the health of Michigan residents.  Their creativity, expertise, and enthusiasm makes them an invaluable partner in our... More

  • Hiring Brogan & Partners to help Michigan Women’s Foundation create the brand and messaging around the campaign to raise millions of dollars to solve the backlog of untested rape kits in Detroit was a slam dunk!  With a well-deserved reputation for getting to the heart of complex and highly-charged issues with clear, action-driven communications, the Brogan team... More

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  • When launching a startup, resources are very constrained and a startup has to pick its partners very carefully and with deliberation. There were many services that we have had to forego in the early stages of our company, Memloom. One crucial need, however, was identifying and aligning with a strong marketing partner who could help us with our brand, positioning and... More

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